Don't understand this function, s(cosξ + j sinξ) in my textbook

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  • Thread starter FrankJ777
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  • #1
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My textbook for Advanced Electomagnetics, by Balinas has this identity.

cos θ = se^(jξ) = s( cos ξ + j sin ξ ).

I have no idea what they are saying. Is there an S funtion i'm not aware of?
I've looked back and forth, and he doesn't seem to explain it's use.

I've inserted a picture of the page, to provide context.
Hope I'm in the right section.

20200922_183034.jpg
 

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  • #2
anuttarasammyak
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I assume ##j^2=-1##, right ? Then s is magnitude of complex number ##cos\theta_l## and ##\zeta## is its angle in Gauss plane.
 
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  • #4
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So they are just saying that cos θ can be se^(jξ) = s( cos ξ + j sin ξ ). Where s is any old constant?
They're just decomposing cos θ into a real and imaginary part?
 
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  • #5
DrClaude
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They're just decomposing cos θ into a real and imaginary part?
Yes.
 
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