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Drawing distribution curves for orbitals

  1. Apr 7, 2015 #1
    Hi, can anyone please guide me how to draw the distribution curves for radial wave function of an orbital? Please explain stepwise and in easy way.
    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 7, 2015 #2

    BvU

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    Can you be more specific ? Is this about hydrogen-like potentials or something else ?
    And "distribution curves" ?
     
  4. Apr 7, 2015 #3
    In quantum mechanics, my textbook has this question:
    "Draw the distribution curves for radial wave function of 1s,2s,3s orbitals."
    Distribution curve is "The probability density of finding an electron in polar coordinates."
     
  5. Apr 8, 2015 #4

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    Good. sounds like hydrogen-like potentials. What are the wavefunctons ? What have you got in your toolbox to deal with this exercise ? And how far did you get in your attempt at solution ?

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data


    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  6. Apr 8, 2015 #5
    Well, there are no values given in the question. I'm just a beginner in quantum mechanics and am not good at graph plotting but I'll try with your guidance:)

    The graph is between radius;the distance of orbital from the nucleus and 4πr2 (psi)2, I think the probability density? Now how to plot the graph?
     
  7. Apr 8, 2015 #6

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    In the chapter where your textbook has this question, did they solve the Schroedinger equation by separating variables (first time and position, later also ##r,\ theta, \ \phi## ) and come up with wave functions ? Then the core of this exercise is not how to handle pencil and paper, but how to interpret the wave function, in particular when it's been separated into radial and angular parts.
     
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