Effect on air pressure and volume in an enclosed container

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Summary
I wish to understand if bubble formation in milk while being sloshed around, or the formation of separation layers will affect both the pressure and volume of the air head space above the milk
Summary: I wish to understand if bubble formation in milk while being sloshed around, or the formation of separation layers will affect both the pressure and volume of the air head space above the milk

Hi all : ) I have a basic physics question and sorry if its a very silly question:

Let's say I have a sealed, air tight metal container shaped like a rectangular box, containing non-homogenized milk and a compressed air on top with a pressure of 1Bar and volume of 1L resting on a flat ground.
When the container is tilted at an angle (10 degrees), will there be any changes to the pressure and volume of the air on top?

My intuition told me that the air pressure and volume in an air tight container will remain constant regardless of the container's orientation. Is this a right assumption?

However, someone told me that when the containers are not stationary, the milk will produce 'bubbles" which will affect the air pressure and volume. Also, when the container is stationary, the milk fats will separate and form layers comprising of different ingredients and fat contents, which will also affect the pressure and volume, especially if the package is moved around AFTER such separation has taken place.

Can anyone able to provide me with some insights into whether this may be true?

If there are any effect on the air pressure and volume, if the container is huge with air volume of say 10000L, would it cause a significant changes that might arise safety concerns?

Thank you very much!!
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Wpu
 

russ_watters

Mentor
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When the container is tilted at an angle (10 degrees), will there be any changes to the pressure and volume of the air on top?

My intuition told me that the air pressure and volume in an air tight container will remain constant regardless of the container's orientation. Is this a right assumption?
Assuming uniform temperature, you are correct. How the air and liquid are distributed doesn't affect their total volumes and pressure (except hydrostatic, which shouldn't have much impact).
 

Baluncore

Science Advisor
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I agree the volume should first be considered as being constant.

But I also have a feeling that an emulsion of two immiscible liquids should have a very slightly higher volume than the individual separated components. I think there must be an energy advantage in separating the immiscible components, which suggests the components pack better when differentiated.

At the same time I understand that the buoyancy of the components will separate them by density into layers, which suggests separating an emulsion will release energy, energy that was invested during mixing.
 

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