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EM length of gravitational waves

  1. Feb 17, 2016 #1
    Maybe a stupid question and maybe sensless to ask, but as I don't know, I ask anyway:
    what is the length of the newly found gravitational waves in terms of traditional EM wavelengths?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 17, 2016 #2
    I would think it would be the same as the frequency with which the two bodies orbited one another. I'd think that would be gigameters.
     
  4. Feb 17, 2016 #3

    davenn

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    unless they finally come together in the "unified theory" that physicists are searching for
    putting gravitational waves and EM waves in the same sentence doesn't make sense


    Dave
     
  5. Feb 17, 2016 #4

    jtbell

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    The range of wavelengths is mentioned in this post in the humongous thread about this experiment in our relativity forum:

    https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/advanced-ligo-detection.836670/page-6#post-5374990

    It's a range because the signal didn't have a constant wavelength and frequency. The frequency increased with time (and the wavelength decreased) in a pattern that has been described as a "chirp."

    If by "in terms of traditional EM wavelengths" you mean which electromagnetic waves have similar wavelengths, look up the wavelengths referenced above, in a diagram of the electromagnetic spectrum on Wikipedia or elsewhere. I'm on my way to dinner... :oldwink:
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2016
  6. Feb 17, 2016 #5

    fresh_42

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  7. Feb 17, 2016 #6

    jtbell

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    From the article you cited:
    (I added the boldface.) But these are not the gravitational waves that LIGO detected.

    What LIGO detected was the stronger waves radiated as the two BHs were spiraling towards each other, faster and faster (higher and higher frequency), just before they merged. I can't lay my fingers on it at the moment, but I remember reading that the detected frequency varied from maybe 30 Hz up to a few hundred Hz. Choose 100 Hz as a typical value. Using v = fλ and v = c = 300000 km/s, what do you get for λ?
     
  8. Feb 17, 2016 #7

    fresh_42

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    Thanks for clarification.
     
  9. Feb 18, 2016 #8
    Yes, but gravity waves and EM waves are quite similar in form. They are both consequences of an attractive force in 3+1D. They both propagate at c. So the wavelengths seem like the same thing to me.
     
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