Energy of valence electrons from period of the periodic table

In summary, the conversation discusses the formation of energy bands through the overlapping of atomic orbitals of different chemical elements. The question raised is how the energy of valence electrons is affected by changes in the periodic table, specifically comparing the energy of Si 4 valence electrons to that of Ge 4 valence electrons. The speaker suggests that the energy trends would reflect the ionization energy of the valence electrons.
  • #1
Helena Wells
125
9
TL;DR Summary
This thread is about the energy of energy bands relative to the period of the periodic table(same group)
I am currently studying Electrical Engineering and I have this question: An energy band is formed by the overlapping of atomic orbitals of atoms coming close to each other.I suspect that if the energy of the atomic orbital of the valence electrons of a chemical element is less than the energy of the atomic orbital of the valence electrons of a different chemical orbital then the energy band formed by the overlapping of many orbitals of the first chemical element will be lower in energy than the energy band formed than the energy band formed of the second chemical element.How is the energy of the valence electrons affected by change in the period of the periodic table?(e.g energy of Si 4 valence electrons vs energy of Ge 4 valence electrons)?
 
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  • #2
I would think the energy trends would reflect the ionization energy of the valence electrons.
 
  • #3
chemisttree said:
I would think the energy trends would reflect the ionization energy of the valence electrons.
Ah okay thanks<3.
 

Related to Energy of valence electrons from period of the periodic table

1. What is the relationship between the period of the periodic table and the energy of valence electrons?

The energy of valence electrons increases as you move across a period of the periodic table. This is because the number of protons in the nucleus increases, resulting in a stronger attraction for the valence electrons and therefore a higher energy level.

2. How does the energy of valence electrons affect the reactivity of an element?

The energy of valence electrons plays a crucial role in determining an element's reactivity. Elements with lower energy valence electrons are more likely to react with other elements in order to achieve a more stable electron configuration. On the other hand, elements with higher energy valence electrons are less reactive as they are already close to achieving a stable configuration.

3. Can the energy of valence electrons be predicted based on the position of an element on the periodic table?

Yes, the energy of valence electrons can be predicted based on the element's position on the periodic table. As mentioned earlier, the energy increases as you move across a period. Additionally, the energy also increases as you move down a group due to the addition of new energy levels.

4. How does the energy of valence electrons impact an element's physical properties?

The energy of valence electrons can impact an element's physical properties in various ways. For example, elements with higher energy valence electrons tend to have higher melting and boiling points as the electrons are more tightly bound to the nucleus. On the other hand, elements with lower energy valence electrons may have lower melting and boiling points as the electrons are more easily removed.

5. Can the energy of valence electrons change for an element?

Yes, the energy of valence electrons can change for an element. This can happen through various processes such as gaining or losing electrons, or through the absorption or release of energy. These changes in energy can also impact an element's chemical and physical properties.

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