Energy transfer from x altitude to geosynchrous altitlude (1 Viewer)

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

327
1
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

INTRO TO THE PROBLEM :For a circular orbit around a massive gravitating body, the speed depends on the radius according to the equation V = sqrt (GM/r) ; for elliptical orbits, the speed varies according to the equation v^2 = 2GM([ 1/r - 1/(2a), where r is the distance from the massive body and a is the semimajor axis of the ellipse (i.e., half the sum of the closest and farthest distances). A satellite can be transferred from one circular orbit (at radius r1) to a higher orbit (at radius r1) by boosting the circular speed v1 at v2 to the appropriate speed for an elliptical orbit whose distance varies between r1 and r2 , and then boosting the speed in the elliptical orbit at r2 to the circular speed v2. This is called a Hohmann transfer.

THE PROBLEM STATEMENT :
How much energy is required for the first boost in such a transfer to take a 280kg satellite from a circular orbit at a 400 km altitude to the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit?

change in K_1 = _________J

2. Relevant equations


stated above in the intro

3. The attempt at a solution

clueless?
 

LowlyPion

Homework Helper
3,055
4
The conservation of energy still works doesn't it?

(Potential + Kinetic) before + Energy = (Potential + Kinetic) after?
 
327
1
so,

1/2mv^2 - GMm/r = 1/2mv^2 - GMm/r

?
 
327
1
I'm sorry i am confused
 

LowlyPion

Homework Helper
3,055
4
I'm sorry i am confused
You have initial potential energy and kinetic energy in lower orbit.

You add energy.

You get a higher orbit with kinetic energy and potential energy.
 
327
1
how about saying it mathematically. can you start me off?
 

LowlyPion

Homework Helper
3,055
4
how about saying it mathematically. can you start me off?
You have the equation below. I'm sure you can do it.

Besides if it comes up on a quiz, I won't be there to start you off. It's good practice.
 
327
1
So whats the formula to delta k ?
 
327
1
ok. r is the radius of the earth + 400km and a is ? And that formula above v^2 =...
is delta K ?
 

LowlyPion

Homework Helper
3,055
4
ok. r is the radius of the earth + 400km and a is ? And that formula above v^2 =...
is delta K ?
Well that's a good part of it, but strictly speaking you want to be working with ½mv² for KE. so use the v² 's that you find to determine your ½mv² 's.
 
327
1
How would I represent (a) as? in the equation above?
 

LowlyPion

Homework Helper
3,055
4
Don't look now, but they tell you how to determine a in the problem. If your ellipse is to vary between r1 and r2, what is the semi-major axis?
 
327
1
(r1+r2) / 2
 

The Physics Forums Way

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top