Engineering Graduate School Admissions with Physics Degree

In summary, the conversation discusses the concerns of a college student who wants to major in physics but is considering applying for engineering graduate school instead. The student is worried about how their physics degree will be viewed by admissions, as most accepted GPAs for engineering graduate school are higher than their current GPA. The expert summarizes that the student will be considered underprepared compared to engineering students and will need to excel in other areas to make up for it. The student also asks if having a similar GPA but more experience in research and publications would make them a more competitive applicant, to which the expert responds that it is ultimately up to the admissions committee to decide. The main point is that the student will need to stand out in other ways to compensate for their lack
  • #1
kitaewolf
8
0
Hi, I'm a concerned college student (aren't we all :0 ), who is intending to major in physics in one of the bigger universities in US. However, it seems that my inclination lately lies more towards engineering graduate school (if I go). So if I apply for an engineering grad school with physics degree (of course to engineering school that accepts physics degree) will the admissions view my GPA differently? For example, I see that most accepted GPA for even the major engineering grad school ranges from 3.4 to 3.6. With my degree in physics, will the admissions expect my GPA to maybe around that or higher?
 
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  • #2
You will be underprepared compared to engineering students. Therefore you will have to be better than them in other areas.
 
  • #3
So would that imply that I would probably have to have a better grade than other engineering applicants? Or would I have to take more classes in engineering as a preparation? What do you mean in terms of other areas??
 
  • #4
As many of those things as you can do. You look worse than the other students in terms of preparation, so you need to make up for that by looking better somewhere else.
 
  • #5
I'm quite sure that excelling in all area will be beneficial for me, but if i have about the same GPA as engineering applicants who enters into the graduate program (like let's say GPA of 3.4-3.6), and about the same in terms of other preparations, would I still have a chance to get into a more competitive graduate school? Or what if I have about the same GPA but have more experience in terms of research, published paper? Would those be enough for me to look "better prepared"?
 
  • #6
Nobody can tell you for sure what the committee (who has access to material we do not) will think. All I can say is that you are less prepared, so you need to make up for it somehow.
 

Related to Engineering Graduate School Admissions with Physics Degree

1. What is the minimum GPA requirement for engineering graduate school with a physics degree?

The minimum GPA requirement for engineering graduate school varies depending on the school and program. Generally, a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 is recommended, but some competitive programs may require a higher GPA.

2. Do I need a strong background in engineering courses to be admitted to graduate school?

While having a strong background in engineering courses can be beneficial, it is not always necessary for admission into graduate school with a physics degree. Admissions committees will also look at your overall academic performance, research experience, and other relevant qualifications.

3. Will my physics degree be considered relevant for engineering graduate school?

Yes, a physics degree is often considered relevant for engineering graduate school. Physics and engineering have many overlapping concepts and skills, such as problem-solving, critical thinking, and mathematical proficiency. However, it is recommended to have a strong foundation in math and science courses related to your desired engineering field.

4. Is work experience required for engineering graduate school admissions with a physics degree?

Work experience is not always required for engineering graduate school admissions with a physics degree. However, relevant research or industry experience can strengthen your application and make you a more competitive candidate. It is also important to highlight any relevant skills or experiences in your application materials.

5. Are there any specific entrance exams required for engineering graduate school with a physics degree?

Many engineering graduate programs require applicants to take the GRE (Graduate Record Examination) general test. Some programs may also require subject-specific GRE tests, such as the GRE Physics or GRE Mathematics subject tests. It is important to check the admissions requirements for each program you are interested in to determine which exams are necessary.

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