Experiments supporting Newton's gravitational theory

In summary, Newton's gravitational theory, also known as the law of universal gravitation, explains that objects in the universe attract each other with a force proportional to their masses and inversely proportional to the distance between them. This theory is supported by experiments such as the Cavendish experiment and the Apollo 15 feather drop experiment. It differs from Einstein's theory of general relativity, which describes gravity as the curvature of space and time. However, Newton's theory is still important in modern science as it is a good approximation for everyday situations and serves as the basis for more advanced theories. Some criticisms of Newton's theory include its inability to explain certain phenomena and its incompatibility with quantum mechanics. It has also been criticized for relying on the
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Apart from Cavendish two lead attracting spheres experiment are there any other experiments (done in lab scale) that support Newton's gravitational theory?
Dose scanning prop instruments (AFM, STM) suffers from drift due to gravitational attractions between the instrument mass (not the tip mass, which is very small) and large buildings around?
 
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Many experiments, but not scanning microscopy. Eric Adelberger's group at Washington has some of the best measurements on small scales. Large scales have tower experiments and larger still you have Venus radar ranging.
 
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Thanks Vanadium 50.
Very intersting
 

What is Newton's gravitational theory?

Newton's gravitational theory, also known as the law of universal gravitation, states that every object in the universe attracts every other object with a force directly proportional to their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

What are some examples of experiments that support Newton's gravitational theory?

Some examples include the Cavendish experiment, where two lead spheres were used to measure the force of gravity between them, and the Apollo 15 feather drop experiment, where a feather and a hammer were dropped on the moon to demonstrate that in the absence of air resistance, all objects fall at the same rate due to gravity.

How does Newton's gravitational theory differ from Einstein's theory of general relativity?

Newton's theory is a classical theory of gravitation that describes gravity as a force between objects, while Einstein's theory is a modern and more accurate theory that describes gravity as the curvature of space and time caused by the presence of massive objects.

Why is Newton's gravitational theory still important in modern science?

Although it has been superseded by Einstein's theory, Newton's theory is still used in many practical applications and is a good approximation for most everyday situations. It also serves as the foundation for understanding and developing more advanced theories of gravity.

What are some potential limitations or criticisms of Newton's gravitational theory?

Some limitations include its inability to explain certain phenomena, such as the precession of Mercury's orbit, and its lack of compatibility with quantum mechanics. It has also been criticized for its reliance on the concept of action at a distance, which has been deemed philosophically problematic by some scientists.

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