Explaining the Nucleus: Positive Charges & Observations

In summary, the scientific community initially resisted the idea of a nucleus full of positive charges due to the repulsive force between like charges. However, with Rutherford's experiments and the discovery of the strong nuclear force, this design was explained and led to the understanding of nuclear energy.
  • #1
vfdismer001
2
0
Can you tell me the answer to this question?
Why would the scientific community resist the concept of a nucleus full of positive charges and what observations helped them explain this design.

Thanks,
v
 
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  • #2
vfdismer001 said:
Can you tell me the answer to this question?
Why would the scientific community resist the concept of a nucleus full of positive charges and what observations helped them explain this design.

Thanks,
v

While considering the effect of a very powerful magnet, try to think of what would happen if you stuck the positive ends of a bunch of magnets together. Try to keep them there.

As for the second aspect, look to Rutherford and his experimentation with [itex]\alpha[/itex]-particle (alpha particle) bombardment.
 
Last edited:
  • #3
two like charges repel, therefore a positive nucleus seemed impossible (especially seeing as this repeling force is more than a billion million times stronger than gravity)!

Something called the strong nuclear force was discovered that helped to explain this force. The strong force holds the nucleus together and acts over and extremely short distance. The force has so much energy that Relativity shows that the mass of the nucleus most decrease to account for all of this energy. This also lays the foundation for nuclear energy.
 

Related to Explaining the Nucleus: Positive Charges & Observations

1. What is the nucleus and how does it contribute to an atom's overall charge?

The nucleus is the central part of an atom that contains most of its mass. It is composed of positively charged protons and neutral neutrons, which contribute to an atom's overall positive charge.

2. How do scientists observe the positive charges within the nucleus?

Scientists use various techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance and particle accelerators, to study the behavior of particles within the nucleus and observe their positive charges.

3. What is the significance of the positive charges within the nucleus?

The positive charges within the nucleus play a crucial role in determining an atom's chemical and physical properties. They also contribute to the stability of an atom and its ability to form chemical bonds.

4. Why are there only positive charges within the nucleus and no negative charges?

The positive charges within the nucleus are due to the presence of protons, which have a positive charge. Neutrons, on the other hand, have no charge. The absence of negative charges is due to the fact that electrons, which have a negative charge, are found outside the nucleus in the electron cloud.

5. How does the number of positive charges within a nucleus affect its stability?

The number of positive charges within a nucleus, also known as the atomic number, determines the element's identity and can affect its stability. Generally, the higher the atomic number, the less stable the nucleus is, leading to radioactive decay and the release of energy.

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