Finding speed of a falling brick using distance and the acceleration of gravity

In summary, the SUVAT equations are necessary for studying physics and understanding the relationship between speed, acceleration, and distance. In this conversation, the question about the falling brick confused the two concepts and resulted in an incorrect answer. The correct approach is to use the SUVAT equations, which can be learned from external resources.
  • #1
vytrx
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Homework Statement
A supervisor 1.8m tall visits a construction site a brick resting at the edge of a roof 50m above the ground suddenly falls at the instant when the brick has fallen 30m without encountering any air resistance, the supervisor sees the brick coming down directly towards him from above as shown in the following figure. (attached) Calculate the speed of the brick after it has falled 30 m from the roof
Relevant Equations
Speed=distance/time
acceleration of gravity is 10m/s^2
Since the brick has fallen 30m and the acceleration of gravity is 10m/s^2 the brick would have fallen 3 seconds speed of brick would then be 30/3 leaving the answer at 10m/s?I am new to physics and this question has left me stumped
 

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  • #2
vytrx said:
Relevant Equations:: Speed=distance/time
That's only true for constant speed. Or, in simple cases, for calculating the average speed.

Do you know the SUVAT equations?

vytrx said:
Since the brick has fallen 30m and the acceleration of gravity is 10m/s^2 the brick would have fallen 3 seconds
You may be confusing speed and acceleration here.
vytrx said:
speed of brick would then be 30/3 leaving the answer at 10m/s?
This is not correct.

:welcome:
 
  • #3
PeroK said:
That's only true for constant speed. Or, in simple cases, for calculating the average speed.

Do you know the SUVAT equations?You may be confusing speed and acceleration here.

This is not correct.

:welcome:
No I'm not familiar with the SUVAT equations, yes I may be confusing the two would you care to explain how this question is done? I've asked one of my friends that said that the answer was 24.5 but I'm not entirely sure how to get there
 
  • #4
vytrx said:
No I'm not familiar with the SUVAT equations, yes I may be confusing the two would you care to explain how this question is done? I've asked one of my friends that said that the answer was 24.5 but I'm not entirely sure how to get there
The SUVAT equations are the starting point for a study of physics, so you'll need to learn about them. Try this to get you started.

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/webtemplate/a...mechanics/kinematics/equations-of-motion.html
 
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Related to Finding speed of a falling brick using distance and the acceleration of gravity

1. How do you calculate the speed of a falling brick using distance and the acceleration of gravity?

To calculate the speed of a falling brick, you can use the formula v = √(2gh), where v is the velocity, g is the acceleration of gravity (9.8 m/s²), and h is the distance the brick has fallen.

2. What is the acceleration of gravity?

The acceleration of gravity is a constant value that represents the acceleration an object experiences due to the force of gravity. On Earth, this value is approximately 9.8 m/s².

3. Why is distance important in finding the speed of a falling brick?

Distance is important because it is a key component in the formula for calculating speed. Without knowing the distance the brick has fallen, it is impossible to accurately determine its speed.

4. Can the acceleration of gravity change?

No, the acceleration of gravity is a constant value that does not change unless the object is on a different planet or in a different location with a different gravitational force.

5. How does air resistance affect the speed of a falling brick?

Air resistance can slow down the speed of a falling brick. As the brick falls, it pushes against air molecules which creates a force in the opposite direction of its motion. This force, known as air resistance, can reduce the speed of the falling brick.

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