1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Finding The Equidistant of 2 Points

  1. Oct 18, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    I need the formula for finding the coordinates of the point on the y axis that are equildistant from two other pair of points (3,0) and
    (3,6).

    2. Relevant equations
    i don't know, but these might have something to do with it.

    [tex]\sqrt{}[/tex] (y2-y1)2+(x2-x1)2

    (x2+x1[tex]/[/tex]2, y2+y1[tex]/2[/tex])

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I found the midpoint of (3,0)-(3,6), and found the distance between the midpoint to the endpoints, but i don't know were to got from there. I also tried writing random scribbles on my graph papers, crying, begging God to take me out of IB extended math, and finally, posting on Physics Forums for help.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2009 #2

    LCKurtz

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Hint: Points equidistant from your two points would be on the perpendicular bisector of the line joining them. Draw a sketch.
     
  4. Oct 18, 2009 #3
    Ah Yes, but that would be too easy!:wink: I need to find the anwser using an equation.
     
  5. Oct 18, 2009 #4

    LCKurtz

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Sure. Solve for the mid-point between your points. Write the equation of the perpendicular bisector. Solve for where it hits the y axis. The picture was just to lead the way.
     
  6. Oct 18, 2009 #5
    ohhhhhhhhhhh......

    Probably should have looked up "perpendicular bisector". I knew what perpendicular meant, but you threw me off at bisector.

    Anyway, thanks for the information. Saved me hours of going over "attempt at solution" again
     
  7. Oct 19, 2009 #6

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    This is particularly simple because it is a vertical line. Any line perpendicular to it is a horizontal line and has the equation "y= constant". But the problem is finding that constant. To do that you need to know the y-component of the midpoint, which was what the original question asked!

    It should be obvious what the x-component is. What point is half way between 0 and 6 on the number line?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook