Finding the orbital height of a satellite

  • #1

Homework Statement


I have to find the orbital height of a satellite with a specific g force (ie. the acceleration due to gravity). g=5.7(ms)2


Homework Equations



So far I have been using the equation g=Gm/(r+h)2 to find the acceleration due to gravity, where G= gravitational constant, m=mass of the Earth ,r=radius of the earth and h= the orbital height from the Earth

except now I am given a specific g force and have been asked to find the height.


The Attempt at a Solution

 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
rock.freak667
Homework Helper
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Homework Equations



So far I have been using the equation g=Gm/(r+h)2 to find the acceleration due to gravity, where G= gravitational constant, m=mass of the Earth ,r=radius of the earth and h= the orbital height from the Earth

except now I am given a specific g force and have been asked to find the height.


The Attempt at a Solution


Not sure what is puzzling you.

g=GM/(r+h)2 and they give you g=5.7 m/s2

∴5.7=GM/(R+h)2

G,M and R are all known, cross multiply and then do some algebra to get 'h'.
 
  • #3
Cheers,
bit slow on the uptake today, but that was all I wanted to know.
 
  • #4
Back again, moving the equation around dosn't help because the h is inside the brackets, along with the Earth's radius (r+h). What am I missing?
 
  • #5
rock.freak667
Homework Helper
6,223
31
Back again, moving the equation around dosn't help because the h is inside the brackets, along with the Earth's radius (r+h). What am I missing?

When you reach (R+h)2=A, take the square root of both sides.
 

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