Finding the tension of two cables holding an object at rest

In summary, the conversation discusses a 30 kg sphere being held stationary by two cables. One cable is attached at a 60° angle above horizontal and the second cable is horizontal and attached at the side of the sphere. The tension in both cables needs to be found using Newton's 2nd law, F=ma, and the weight, W=mg. To find the tension, one must consider the vector sum of all forces acting on the sphere and use simultaneous equations to solve for the tension values.
  • #1
WOLFY302
2
1
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A 30 kg sphere is held stationary by two cables. One cable is attached at 60° above horizontal. The second cable is horizontal and attached at the side of the sphere. Find the tension in both cables.

Newton's 2nd law: F=ma, which means a = (∑F/m)
We can also find the weight: W = mg

Let's say that the tension for the angled cable is T1 and the tension for the horizontal cable is T2. Weight is mg, or (30 kg)(9.8 m/s^2). Acceleration is zero since the sphere is stationary, which means 0 = (∑F/m).

I'm not sure what to do from here. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

WOLFY

 
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  • #2
Your ##\sum F## is a vector sum ##\sum \vec F##. How about that ?
 
  • #3
BvU said:
Your ##\sum F## is a vector sum ##\sum \vec F##. How about that ?
I understand but how do I get to finding tension?
 
  • #4
WOLFY302 said:
I understand but how do I get to finding tension?
Vectors have components...

Which components have to hold up the sphere (against what)? Which components have to balance each other so the sphere doesn't move sideways?
 
  • #5
You did make a sketch, right ? Does it show what ##\sum F =0 ## means ?

And, uh, :welcome: !
 
  • #7
A vector is zero if all its (cartesian) components are zero
can you post your sketch (aka free body diagram, which google if not known) ?
 
  • #8
Have you been taught how to approach statics problems? In short... The net force in any direction is zero. So you can write simultaneous equations, perhaps one for the vertical direction and one for the horizontal direction. Then solve them to find whatever value the question asks for.
 

Related to Finding the tension of two cables holding an object at rest

What is the tension of two cables holding an object at rest?

The tension of two cables holding an object at rest is the amount of force exerted by each cable in order to keep the object in place. It is measured in units of force, such as newtons or pounds.

How is the tension of the cables calculated?

The tension of the cables can be calculated using the following formula: Tension = Weight of the object / Number of cables. This formula assumes that the weight of the object is evenly distributed between the two cables.

What factors can affect the tension of the cables?

The tension of the cables can be affected by several factors, including the weight of the object, the angle of the cables, the length of the cables, and the elasticity of the cables. Changes in any of these factors can alter the tension of the cables.

How can the tension of the cables be measured?

The tension of the cables can be measured using a tension meter or a force gauge. These tools can accurately measure the amount of force exerted by the cables and provide a numerical value for the tension.

What is the relationship between the tension of the cables and the stability of the object?

The tension of the cables plays a crucial role in the stability of the object. If the tension is too low, the object may not be held in place and could fall. If the tension is too high, it could put too much stress on the cables and cause them to break. Finding the right tension is important for maintaining the stability of the object.

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