Finding Torque/Vert/Horiz. Forces for a Sign

In summary, the sign Ye Olde Tavern has a weight of 294 N, and the horizontal and vertical forces on the wall attachment at point A are 295 N and 0 N, respectively.
  • #1
mmravunac
9
0
1. The sign Ye Olde Tavern is supported by a horizontal beam (A-C) and a cable (B-C). The sign has a weight of W= 294 N.
a) Take (Summate) the torques of the system about point A then find the tension in the cable.
b) Find the vertical force on the wall attachment at point A by taking torque about point C.
c) Find horizontal force on the wall attachment at point A.


The Angle is θ
Total Length of the beam is 4d with the sign being equal to 3d (so there is a gap of 1d)
A is the base right angle
B is where the cable and pole meet
C is where the cable and beam meet.


T=Ia
Fx - Tcosx = 0
Fy + Tsinx -Fg = 0




I really have no idea how to go about this problem but for
a) at point A ƩT=∅ along with ƩF=∅
so I believe that tension would have to equal T=0 for the cord (?)
 
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  • #2
Hello mmravunac,

Could you please show me the diagram as I'm not able to see it in my mind.

Sunil
 
  • #3
http://s3.amazonaws.com/answer-board-image/ce8f6cfa-260b-4780-bb33-e34383a726e2.png

This is the link to the diagram
 
  • #4
Thanks,

You are right about a) that the net torque about A is zero but are you sure tension is zero?

What are the forces acting on the rod? Where are they acting relative to A?
 
  • #5
You need to work out carefully and with patience. Your question itself gives many hints. Normal reaction on the rod by the wall has two components. By taking torque about A, you need not include those forces. Carefully sum anticlockwise and clockwise torques to 0 about A. Do not forget any forces. (Of course torque of normal reactions at beam about A is 0).

Also, horizontal beam is assumed to be massless, right ? Do not forget to resolve components of tension. Also, make an equation for translational equilibrium along horizontal and vertical directions respectively. It might help you.
 
  • #6
So i think I would have to set the equation to
Mb is Beam mass which is 0 (?)T*4d - Mbg*2.5d - 294N*4d*cos(θ) = 0
which is set to

T*4d = 294N*4d*cos
Dividing each side by 4d gives us

T= 294Ncos(θ) is this right or can I do more?

EDIT: on my graphing calculation when i type in 294cos(theta) it gives me 294.
So does this mean my tension is 294N?
 
Last edited:
  • #7
mmravunac said:
So i think I would have to set the equation to
Mb is Beam mass which is 0 (?)


T*4d - Mbg*2.5d - 294N*4d*cos(θ) = 0
which is set to

Is it T or a component of T? Think about it. (torque= r x F)
 

Related to Finding Torque/Vert/Horiz. Forces for a Sign

1. What is torque and why is it important in finding the forces for a sign?

Torque is a measure of the rotational force applied to an object. In the context of finding forces for a sign, torque is important because it is what causes the sign to rotate or turn. Understanding torque allows us to determine the forces that are acting on the sign and how to balance them to keep the sign in place.

2. How do I calculate torque for a sign?

To calculate torque for a sign, you will need to know the distance from the pivot point (where the sign is attached) to the point where the force is being applied, as well as the magnitude and direction of the force. The formula for torque is torque = force x distance. Make sure to use consistent units for both force and distance in your calculation.

3. What are vertical forces and how do they affect the stability of a sign?

Vertical forces are forces that act in an up or down direction. In the context of a sign, these forces include the weight of the sign itself as well as any additional weight or wind load acting on the sign. Vertical forces play a crucial role in the stability of a sign as they can cause the sign to tip over or lean if not properly balanced with horizontal forces.

4. How do I find the horizontal forces acting on a sign?

Horizontal forces are forces that act in a side-to-side direction. In order to find these forces for a sign, you will need to consider any external forces such as wind or other objects pushing against the sign. You may also need to account for any internal forces, such as the force of tension in a rope or cable holding the sign in place.

5. What are some common methods for securing a sign and preventing it from falling over?

Some common methods for securing a sign and preventing it from falling over include using a sturdy base or frame, anchoring the sign to the ground or a building, using guy wires or cables for support, and considering the orientation and weight of the sign to minimize the effects of wind. It is important to carefully assess the forces acting on the sign and choose a secure and appropriate method for securing it.

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