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First term test 8 mark triple TIPS question

  1. Oct 6, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    (note: this is not an easy question and will be marked very strictly.)
    Find the values of the constant a and b such that limx->0 ((ax+b)^1/3)-2)/x = 5/12
    NOTE: you are not allowed to use L'Hospital's Rules for this question


    2. Relevant equations
    whatever you learned in calculus. theres not really specified equations to these questions


    3. The attempt at a solution
    finding b is quite simple. i know that 0/0 provides a hole in the graph of this function, so i want a b value that will give me such a hole because it will be the cause of the limit approaching that hole. thats my logic however skewed it may be, but i find it to be extraordinarily beneficial. so b would simplybe 8 since 8^1/3 is 2, and 2-2 is 0 and thus you get zero over 0. finding a is another story, i need some tips because i have no idea where to begin! thank you once again for saving my life lol..
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 6, 2008 #2

    Dick

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    This is again a difference quotient for the derivative of the function f(x)=(ax+8)^(1/3) evaluated at x=0. To prove it from first principles you have to go back and figure out how you proved (x^(1/3))'=(1/3)*x^(-2/3). Are you making up these silly rules that you can't use calculus to solve these limits? Because the whole point to calculus is to solve limits like this without having to go back and prove them from first principles every time.
     
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