Flawless Falcon Flight (SpaceX)

In summary, SpaceX successfully launched and landed a Falcon 9 rocket carrying the JCSAT-14 satellite. The landing was not entirely flawless, but the booster was still able to touch down on the barge, albeit with more damage than previous landings. The flight profile for this mission required more heat shielding for the booster due to the higher delta-v missions it was tasked with. SpaceX has developed a "crush core" to help absorb energy in the telescoping actuator of the booster, allowing it to survive harder impacts during landings. This technology is similar to that used on the Apollo moon landers. Overall, the mission was a success and SpaceX continues to improve and learn from each landing attempt.
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  • #2

:smile:
 
  • #5
mheslep said:
That sounds as if they've still not cracked booster reuse of the higher delta-v missions: too much heating or too little return fuel available.
This flight profile apparently heat was the issue, about four or more times the normal load.

http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/local/spacex-falcon-9-first-stage-booster-suffered-max-damage-on-landing/207178195
 
  • #6
1oldman2 said:
This flight profile apparently heat was the issue, about four or more times the normal load.

http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/local/spacex-falcon-9-first-stage-booster-suffered-max-damage-on-landing/207178195
Yes, as I said this flight had a more challenging orbit requiring more velocity. That class of satellites appear beyond reach of reusable boosters with the current SpaceX booster design or configuration.
 
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  • #7
I see the video indicates the booster for raising geosynchronous mission hits the atmosphere twice as fast as a LEO mission, thus the booster has four times the energy, generating eight times the heat.
 
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  • #9
Seems as if SpaceX should already know the max temperature encountered on return by the booster for this mission profile, and should thus be able predict booster reuseability, whether or not the booster lands succesfully. How many crispy boosters will they expensively retrieve only to be stored in a warehouse as opposed to the bottom of thee Atlantic?
 
  • #10
I expect a work around attempt very soon, they have a good learning curve.
 
  • #12
Curious about the condition of this booster, nice landing though. :ok:
 
  • #13
Good job.
Looks like the barge has to be designed to dissipate a lot of sudden heating and gas presure.
 
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  • #14
rootone said:
Good job.
Looks like the barge has to be designed to dissipate a lot of sudden heating and gas presure.
And likely a rocket crash from time to time. :wink:
 
  • #15
About 21 minutes into video is lift off, a nice flight.

:doh: The video link I posted earlier in this thread was from an earlier landing, sorry about that. This landing occurs at about 29 minutes into the tech broadcast.
 
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  • #16
This is an engineering aspect I wasn't aware of.
"Touchdown was somewhat harder than previous landings, causing the ‘Contingency Crush Core’
to come into play to cushion the impact, a device Elon Musk describes as an “aluminum honeycomb for
energy absorption in the telescoping actuator.” This is a replaceable part giving Falcon 9 the ability to survive
corner-case landings at higher speeds. What implications the Crush Core actually crushing has on recovery operations
is unknown". (From- http://spaceflight101.com/thaicom-8-space-x-launch-success/ )
My favorite segment of the video was the view from the core booster at roughly 26-28 minutes, The video of that view ends with what appears to be a camera meltdown.
 
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  • #17
As I recall a similar honeycomb was used in the legs of the Apollo moon landers. I suspect it's just a matter of changing the shock absorber bit like you can do on a car.
 
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  • #18
CWatters said:
As I recall a similar honeycomb was used in thesuspension legs of the Apollo moon landers. I suspect it's just a matter of changing the shock absorber bit like you can do on a car.
Sure enough, there it is. In all the Apollo landings I have watched I had never considered the LM's suspension, thanks for pointing this out.

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/LM_Landing Gear1973010151.pdf
LM suspension.PNG

LM suspension 2.PNG
 
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  • #20
Interesting, thanks.
 
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1. What is "Flawless Falcon Flight"?

"Flawless Falcon Flight" is a term used to describe the successful launch and landing of a SpaceX Falcon rocket. It refers to the smooth and flawless execution of the entire flight, from liftoff to touchdown.

2. What makes the Falcon rocket unique?

The Falcon rocket is unique because it was designed and built by SpaceX, a private space company, rather than a government agency. It is also the first reusable rocket, meaning it can be launched multiple times, significantly reducing the cost of space travel.

3. How does SpaceX achieve a successful Falcon flight?

SpaceX utilizes advanced technology and engineering techniques to ensure a successful Falcon flight. This includes rigorous testing, advanced computer simulations, and constant monitoring and adjustments during the flight.

4. What are the benefits of a successful Falcon flight?

A successful Falcon flight has several benefits, including reducing the cost of space travel, making it more accessible, and paving the way for future space exploration and colonization. It also allows for the delivery of satellites and supplies to the International Space Station.

5. What are the future plans for the Falcon rocket?

SpaceX plans to continue using the Falcon rocket for future space missions, with the ultimate goal of sending humans to Mars. They also plan to further improve the technology and capabilities of the rocket, such as increasing its payload capacity and making it fully reusable.

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