Force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet

In summary, the conversation discusses the experiments involving Oxygen and Nitrogen soap bubbles and their attraction or repulsion by a magnet. The question arises of how to calculate the attraction force of a pure Oxygen soap bubble in air due to a magnet. It is suggested that the force on a single O2 molecule must be calculated and then summed over the volume of the bubble with corresponding O2 density. However, determining the force on a single O2 molecule due to a magnet is a complex task that requires knowledge beyond the scope of the conversation. The importance of an inhomogeneous magnetic field for attracting an Oxygen bubble is also mentioned. The conversation ends with a reference to a Wikipedia page for computing the magnetic moment of an electron, but notes the difficulty
  • #1
Gnorrell
3
0
There are the famous experiments, which show, how an Oxygen soap bubble gets attracted by a magnet due to it's paramagnetism. And how a Nitrogen bubble gets repelled by it (in air)But how does one calculate the attraction force of this pure Oxygen soap bubble in air due to a magnet.

I'm Sorry, this isn't directly a homework. But I really want to be able to calculate this, as I found this experiment very astounding. But unfortunately I lack the ability to calculate it.

I would think I have to calculate the force on one O2 molecule due to the magnet and then sum it up over the volume of the bubble with the corresponding O2 density. Then I have to subtract the O2 density of the air from it (as it wouldn't be attracted if it has the same O2 concentration), to get the total force.

But how does one calculate the force on a single O2 molecules due to a magnet. And is only the magnetic (field) strength important here for the force developed or also the inhomogenity. I would expect that in a homogeneous m-field there would be no force.

Thanks for any answers or hints on how to solve this problem.
 
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  • #2
Oxygen has a high degree of paramagnetism due tio the fact that its outer two electrons' spins are not paired.

You are correct in assuming that it would take an inhomogeneous magnetic field to attract an oxygen bubble. Which of course you get from an ordinary bar magnet.

Computing the magnetic moment of an oxygen atom is beyond what I know. I refer you to
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_moment for the computation of the magnetic moment of an electron. The formula is simple but determining the spin of the electron is what I don't know how to determine.

BTW be sure to take note of the quantum electrodynamic correction to the Dirac g-factor in order to avoid an error of 0.1%.

I love this job. :-)
 

Related to Force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet

1. What is the force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet?

The force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet is a result of the interaction between the magnetic field of the magnet and the magnetic dipole moment of the oxygen molecule. This force is known as the magnetic force and can be calculated using the equation F = qvB, where q is the charge of the oxygen molecule, v is its velocity, and B is the magnetic field strength.

2. How does the force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet affect its motion?

The force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet can cause the bubble to experience a change in its motion. This change can either be a deflection or a rotation, depending on the orientation of the magnet and the bubble's initial position. The force can also cause the bubble to move towards or away from the magnet, depending on the direction of the magnetic field.

3. What factors can influence the force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet?

The force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet can be influenced by various factors such as the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, the charge and velocity of the oxygen molecule, and the distance between the magnet and the bubble. Other external factors like the presence of other magnetic fields and air currents can also affect the force.

4. How can the force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet be measured?

The force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet can be measured using a variety of methods. One common method is to use a balance scale, where the force on the bubble is balanced against a known force. Another method is to use a force sensor or a spring scale to directly measure the force on the bubble. Additionally, the motion of the bubble can be observed and recorded to indirectly determine the force.

5. Can the force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet be manipulated?

Yes, the force on a pure oxygen bubble in air by a magnet can be manipulated by changing the strength or orientation of the magnetic field, as well as the properties of the oxygen molecule such as its charge and velocity. The distance between the magnet and the bubble can also be adjusted to alter the force. By manipulating these factors, the force on the bubble can be controlled and used for various applications in science and technology.

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