Friction, Forces, Coefficient of Friction (True/False) Simple

In summary, the force that you exert on the filing cabinet will be equal to the frictional force on the cabinet. The force that you exert on the filing cabinet will be more than the frictional force on the cabinet, as it would result in acceleration. If you exerted twice the force, the cabinet would slide at a constant speed that is twice the original value. The force that you exert on the filing cabinet will be less than its weight, as the normal force (equal to the weight) is the maximum frictional force that can be exerted.
  • #1
FAJISTE
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Homework Statement



You are pushing a filing cabinet across a rough floor (μk = 0.41) in a straight line at a constant speed. Which of the following statements about the magnitudes of the forces acting on the filing cabinet are correct?
(T/F)the force that you exert on the filing cabinet will be equal to the frictional force on the cabinet
(T/F) the force that you exert on the filing cabinet will be more than the frictional force on the cabinet
(T/F)if you exerted twice the force, the cabinet would slide at a constant speed that is twice the original value
(T/F) the force that you exert on the filing cabinet will be more than its weight
(T/F)the force that you exert on the filing cabinet will be less than its weight

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



1. True I assume because it's at a constant speed
2. False I assume because then it would be accelerating?
3. False, I assume it would just be moving faster and accelerating not at constant speed
4. No idea
5. No idea

Help please, some explanations too would be great. I really appreciate it.
 
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  • #2
The expression for frictional force is

[tex]f_k=\mu_k\mbox{N}[/tex]

N is the normal force and in this case is equal to the weight of the cabinet. This information should help you with the last two questions.
 
  • #3
Sweet, sometimes I'm a little slow, those last two were easy :P
 

Related to Friction, Forces, Coefficient of Friction (True/False) Simple

1. What is friction?

Friction is the force that opposes the motion of two surfaces in contact with each other. It is caused by microscopic irregularities on the surface of objects, which creates resistance when they move against each other.

2. How is friction measured?

The coefficient of friction is used to measure the strength of friction between two surfaces. It is a ratio of the force required to move an object across a surface to the force pressing the two surfaces together. The lower the coefficient of friction, the easier it is to slide an object across a surface.

3. Is friction always bad?

No, friction can be both helpful and harmful. It can be beneficial when it helps us walk, grip objects, or stop our vehicles from sliding. However, it can also be harmful when it causes wear and tear on machinery or slows down the movement of objects.

4. Does the type of surface affect friction?

Yes, the type of surface can greatly affect the amount of friction between two objects. Smooth surfaces have less friction than rough surfaces, and different materials can have different coefficients of friction. For example, rubber has a higher coefficient of friction than ice, making it easier to walk on a rubber surface than an icy one.

5. Can friction be reduced or eliminated?

Friction can be reduced through the use of lubricants or by polishing surfaces to make them smoother. However, it cannot be completely eliminated as it is a natural force that exists between all surfaces in contact with each other.

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