FRUSTRATING QUESTION: Condensation Reactions with Covalent Bonds

In summary, all four macromolecules - nucleic acids, triglycerides, carbohydrates, and proteins - are formed through condensation reactions. However, only proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids are held together by covalent bonds between monomers. The monomers for proteins are amino acids, for carbohydrates are monosaccharides, and for nucleic acids are nucleotides. Triglycerides do not have monomers.
  • #1
bengalkitties
8
0
Which of the following macromolecules are held together by covalent bonds between monomers and are synthesized through condensation reactions? Choose all correct answers.

Nucleic acids

Triglycerides

Carbohydrates

Proteins


This is what I think:
-Nucleic acids form condensations reactions through phosphodiester linkages. Would this be a type of covalent bond?
-Triglycerides definitely form covalent bonds and I think they form through condensation reactions.
-Carbohydrates: I definitely think they form condensation reactions though covalent bonds.
-Proteins: When they form peptide bond, I think they form condensation reaction.

So what do you all think? Would it be all of them? Any help on which would not be would be hugely appreciated.
 
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  • #2
What are monomers in each case? How many of them? How many monomers per macromolecule?
 
  • #3
As you correctly noted, all four are formed through condensation reactions. Not all of them are formed from bonds between monomers, however.
 
  • #4
Borek said:
What are monomers in each case? How many of them? How many monomers per macromolecule?

So would it be only proteins carbohydrates, and nucleic acids then? The monomer of proteins are amino acids and monomer of carbohydrates are monosacharides. Nucleic acids have monomer nucleotides.

Triglcerides arent composed of monomers.

Would this be correct? This is a very important question to me and I am down to my last opportunity...please help!
 

Related to FRUSTRATING QUESTION: Condensation Reactions with Covalent Bonds

What is a condensation reaction?

A condensation reaction is a chemical reaction in which two or more molecules combine to form a larger molecule, with the simultaneous loss of a small molecule such as water or alcohol.

How do condensation reactions occur with covalent bonds?

Condensation reactions with covalent bonds occur when two molecules with functional groups that are capable of reacting with each other join together, forming a covalent bond and releasing a small molecule, such as water or alcohol.

What are the products of a condensation reaction?

The products of a condensation reaction are a larger molecule formed by the combination of the two smaller molecules, as well as a small molecule, such as water or alcohol, that is released during the reaction.

What is the difference between a condensation reaction and a hydrolysis reaction?

A condensation reaction involves the combination of two molecules to form a larger molecule, while a hydrolysis reaction involves the breaking down of a larger molecule into smaller molecules by the addition of a water molecule.

What are some examples of condensation reactions with covalent bonds?

Some examples of condensation reactions with covalent bonds include the formation of peptides from amino acids, the formation of esters from carboxylic acids and alcohols, and the formation of polyesters from dicarboxylic acids and diols.

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