Fuel that doesnt need compression?

In summary, the author has an idea for an engine that does not use compression, and they are working on a design. The engine uses a rotating ball with slots, without the Wenkel compression principle. The idea is similar to an engine that was found today.
  • #1
SirOrigami
7
0
Excuse the language. English is not my first language and in physics terms I might be lacking.

I was just brainstorming. Is there a fuel that could be used with efficiancy in a compression free engine?
 
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  • #2
Coal in a steam engine doesn't require compression, but somehow I don't think that's the answer you are looking for.

You may have to explain more precisely what you mean.
 
  • #3
Coal good idea =)

I'm working on a design which I don't know if it will ever work.

The idea is an engine with minimal moving parts. And therefore cannot make compression. Or have to use FORCED compression from ? Ex a Jet compressor. I haven't figured that part out yet.
 
  • #5
Well. I had the idea of creating a rotating ball with slots. With a shaft in the center. A spinning ball. Without the wenkel compression principle that (wobbles). Therefore needing a compression free fuel. Or using some sort of forced induction to create compression in the slot before ignition.
 
  • #6
SirOrigami said:
Well. I had the idea of creating a rotating ball with slots. With a shaft in the center. A spinning ball. Without the wenkel compression principle that (wobbles). Therefore needing a compression free fuel. Or using some sort of forced induction to create compression in the slot before ignition.

Forced induction is not the same as compression.

Compression works becuase it puts a fixed quantitiy of fuel into a physically smaller space, allowing combusion at higher temperatures.
 
  • #7
If you are intending an engine where the air/fuel/exhaust is also the working fluid, then not using compression will severely limit the efficiency.
 
  • #8
Out of interest, does this design incorporate some form of expansion of the gases once ignited?
 
  • #9
Yes. Expansion of gases
 
  • #12
Note that pulse detonation still utilizes compression, it just does it in a novel way that uses the explosion's own shock wave to compress the mixture before combustion. Again, you don't want to eliminate compression: compression increases efficiency, it doesn't decrease it.

But if you still truly want compression-free combustion, you're describing a pulse-jet engine. But as far as fuels go, not compressing doesn't provide any limitations on fuel I'm aware of. Any conventional fuel should function in such an engine.
 
  • #13
No. That was not really what I meant. I meant my design did not have a compressing cycle. The compression that becomes when combustion occurs i didn't put into account as compression when I said compression free. =) sorry about that.
 

1. What is fuel that doesn't need compression?

Fuel that doesn't need compression is a type of fuel that can ignite and burn without being compressed. This means it does not require a spark or heat source to initiate combustion.

2. How does fuel that doesn't need compression work?

Fuel that doesn't need compression works by using a chemical reaction to release energy in the form of heat and light. This reaction occurs spontaneously, without the need for external sources of energy.

3. What are the benefits of using fuel that doesn't need compression?

There are several benefits to using fuel that doesn't need compression, including increased efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. This type of fuel also has a wider range of applications and can be used in a variety of engines.

4. Is fuel that doesn't need compression safe to use?

Yes, fuel that doesn't need compression is generally considered safe to use. It has been extensively tested and is regulated by government agencies to ensure it meets safety standards. However, as with any type of fuel, proper handling and storage procedures should be followed to prevent accidents.

5. What are some examples of fuel that doesn't need compression?

Some examples of fuel that doesn't need compression include hydrogen, methane, propane, and natural gas. These fuels are commonly used in vehicles, power plants, and other industrial applications. Biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, can also be considered fuels that don't need compression.

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