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Fundamental note vs fundamental frequency of string

  • Thread starter somecelxis
  • Start date
... depends: 1st overtone of what?

That's correct - and the key to doing this problem.

There are fancy fingering things you can do, but they won't form part of your course.
isnt it the first overtone of string = 528hz? (second resonance of string)
 
... depends: 1st overtone of what?

That's correct - and the key to doing this problem.

There are fancy fingering things you can do, but they won't form part of your course.
the frequncy of sound produced must have at least 1 antinode on one end and 1 node and the another end? which is similar to closed pipe. or the sound produced can be also due to 2 antinodes at both ends? ( just like the open pipe) ... sorry for my poor english. hopefully you can understand.
 

Simon Bridge

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isnt it the first overtone of string = 528hz? (second resonance of string)
You can answer this yourself - what is the relationship between the frequency of the nth overtone and the fundamental frequency? You should have an equation in your notes.

the frequncy of sound produced must have at least 1 antinode on one end and 1 node and the another end?
You should be able to answer this question yourself.
A "node" is a place where the string does not move. An "antinode" is a place where movement is a maximum.
A guitar string is fixed at both ends - so: can a fixed end move?

Please understand: I am not in the habit of doing people's homework for them.
You have enough information to complete your homework by yourself now.

Just to be sure, here's the basics:
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/waves/string.html
 

olivermsun

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Not being a guitar or similar player, I'm not aware of this subtlety. I would think we are dealing with the physics of the sonometer, which deals with strings characterized solely by tension, mass per unit length, and length...'Touching' a string does not seem to fit in with this theory, and would not seem to be the subject of an introductory physics course in any case.

There are fancy fingering things you can do, but they won't form part of your course.
Now that I think about it, the formation of "harmonic" notes may have been discussed when I took high school physics. It can make a great audio-visual demonstration that the vibrating string contains a mixture of modes; by "choosing" nodes at certain parts of the string you essentially select "compatible" sets of modes and therefore the overtone series which is heard.
 
You can answer this yourself - what is the relationship between the frequency of the nth overtone and the fundamental frequency? You should have an equation in your notes.

You should be able to answer this question yourself.
A "node" is a place where the string does not move. An "antinode" is a place where movement is a maximum.
A guitar string is fixed at both ends - so: can a fixed end move?

Please understand: I am not in the habit of doing people's homework for them.
You have enough information to complete your homework by yourself now.

Just to be sure, here's the basics:
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/waves/string.html
A string is fixed at both ends , no sound is produced. The sound can be only produced if at least 1 part of sting contain antinode.....
 

rude man

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Now that I think about it, the formation of "harmonic" notes may have been discussed when I took high school physics. It can make a great audio-visual demonstration that the vibrating string contains a mixture of modes; by "choosing" nodes at certain parts of the string you essentially select "compatible" sets of modes and therefore the overtone series which is heard.
Whatever fancy fingerwork you may or may not have done in your high school physics class has no bearing on this problem.
 

olivermsun

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Please read the last sentence in Simon's post # 25. Whatever you may or may not have done in your high school physics class has no bearing on this problem.
Simon's last sentence reads: "There are fancy fingering things you can do, but they won't form part of your course."

Your assertion, meanwhile, was, "'Touching' a string does not seem to fit in with this theory, and would not seem to be the subject of an introductory physics course in any case."

I gave a counter-example in which "touching" a string was part of an introductory physics course, as a reply to an unfounded assertion made on both your parts.
 

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