Good Source/s for Mechanical Parts?

In summary, McMaster-Carr is a good source for parts, but beware of freight charges. Another good source for parts is old style copiers.
  • #1
GarageTinker
35
0
Does anyone know of any good sources for mechanical parts that already on the market? In my "Garage Tinkering" hobby, as much as possible, I like to use parts and materials that are already available on the market instead of having to manufacture them.
 
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  • #3
  • #4
Since McMaster was already mentioned, here's another couple I use a lot:

http://www.mscdirect.com"

http://www.wmberg.com"
 
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  • #5
Unless your someone blessed with too much money:wink: here is a site i have had good luck with.

http://www.surpluscenter.com/

Be careful when buying heavy items, as frieght charges can eat away at the savings.
 
  • #6
PIC, Stock Drive Products, Small Parts Inc.
 
  • #7
I tend to build small things, so I grab any scrapped typewriter that I can get my hands on. Gazoodles of nuts and bolts, springs, shafts, bearings and gears in one of those. IBM Selectrics also have respectable motors with Gilmer belt drives.
 
  • #8
Good ole Danger. I forgot the best source of all - dumpsters! Then, lots and lots of shoeboxes or baby food jars or cigar boxes or whatever.
 
  • #9
THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU ALL! I've done searches and haven't seen ANY these except MSC Direct. I guess it's time to find a better search engine and / or learn better search techniques :-p. Now all that's left is to convince my wife to let me expand my "Garage Tinkering" hobby budget by 5x! :-)

BTW Danger, thanks for the "dumpster-diving" suggestion, that's an avenue I hadn't considered before.

Just as a side note, if my wife ever finds out where I got my new avenues of searching for parts collection, you might be in trouble for your "encouragements" :-)

Hey! It might be good thing! Between all of the new catalogs I'm going to be getting and all of the parts I'll be stockpiling, maybe I'll be finally able to convince her let me build a real workshop to move my "garage tinkering" into, to move it out of the house/garage! :-)

Next week, a new workshop! Next month, THE WORLD! :-)
 
  • #10
Well, usually I get them before they make it to the dumpster... but I'm not above a bit of snorkelling if necessary. Some people just give me stuff, but the Recycle depot is the best spot. I forgot to mention VCR's; they have lots of gears and motors as well.
 
  • #11
One of the most prosperous sources for parts, is old style copiers, the big units that, sort, staple, and even pat the operator on the butt, have precision shafts, gears, clutch bearings, and all sorts of goodies. If you are near a larger city where printer dealers supply, and repair, they often have to pay to send them to the land fill, or recycle plants, and they will let you take them for free in some cases.
 
  • #12
Thanks for mentioning that, Ron. My boss just asked me if I knew of anybody who might want our old one. It doesn't do any of the fancy stuff; it's just a copier, but I took a boo inside and there are a lot of nifty bits. Now I just have to wait for W to get back on Sunday with the car, 'cause it's way too heavy to walk home with.
 

Related to Good Source/s for Mechanical Parts?

1. Where can I find reliable suppliers for mechanical parts?

There are several options for finding reliable suppliers for mechanical parts. One option is to search online for industrial suppliers or wholesalers. You can also attend trade shows or conferences specific to your industry, where you can meet potential suppliers and discuss their products. Additionally, you can ask for recommendations from colleagues or other professionals in your field.

2. What qualities should I look for in a good source for mechanical parts?

A good source for mechanical parts should have a wide range of products to choose from, competitive prices, and a good reputation for quality and reliability. They should also have good customer service and be able to provide technical support when needed. It is also important to consider their delivery times and policies, as well as their return or exchange policies.

3. How can I ensure the quality of the mechanical parts from a supplier?

To ensure the quality of mechanical parts from a supplier, you can request samples or visit their facility to inspect the products yourself. You can also ask for certifications or quality control measures that the supplier has in place. Additionally, reading reviews or feedback from other customers can give you an idea of the supplier's reputation for quality.

4. Are there any specific industries or applications that a supplier specializes in?

Some suppliers may specialize in certain industries or applications, such as automotive, aerospace, or medical. It is important to research a supplier and their products to determine if they have experience and expertise in your specific industry or application. This can ensure that the parts you receive are suitable for your needs and meet industry standards.

5. How can I negotiate a better price with a supplier for mechanical parts?

Negotiating a better price with a supplier for mechanical parts can be done through various methods, such as bulk orders, long-term contracts, or building a good relationship with the supplier. You can also research the market prices for similar products and use that information to negotiate a better deal. Additionally, being open to alternative or substitute products from the supplier can also lead to cost savings.

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