Graphical Impulse calculation from the graph of force verus time

In summary, The first student tried to calculate the impulse by the area but found it too difficult. The second student then tried to solve the problem by the forumla J=F(t-t0), but didn't understand what F was, so tried to solve it like this: F10) = 8F(33) = -13soEF = 8+-13 = -5T = 33 -10 = 23F = 23 * -5 = -115and the result was wrong. The first student wants to know what he has calculated. The second student wants to know how to graph the area between t=10 and t=12.
  • #1
yesmale4
41
1
Homework Statement
Shown below is a graph of the x-component of the force as a function of time FYP, x(t) that you exert on a particle of mass 18 kg.
FYP, x(t) = 0 at t = 18.095 s.
The particle starts at t = 10 s with an initial x-component of its velocity of 6.420 m/s and moves under the influence of only the force shown in the graph.

What is the x-component of the impulse that you give to the particle from t = 10.00 s until t = 33.00 s.
Relevant Equations
J=F*(t-t0)
area of triangle
area of rectangle
d.png


hello i would like to get some help with this problem.
At first it try to calculate the impulse by the area but i found it too difficult
Then i try to solve it by the forumla J= F(t-t0), but the problem is that i don't know what F is so i try to solve it like this
F10) = 8
F(33) = -13
so
EF = 8+-13 = -5
T = 33 -10 = 23
F = 23 * -5 = -115
and it wrong so i would like to know what I am supposed to do here
 
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  • #2
yesmale4 said:
EF = 8+-13 = -5
What do you think you have calculated there?
How did you try to do it by graph area? Describe the steps.
 
  • #3
haruspex said:
What do you think you have calculated there?
How did you try to do it by graph area? Describe the steps.
about the first question i was thinking that because impulse formula is J=F*(t-t0) and the force isn't constant then if i calculate the change in the force and multiply it by the change of time it will be alright
about the second question i was not able to calculate the area between t = 12 to t= 28 because i don't undertand what kind of shpe it is , its not triangle so that's why i try diffrent method
 
  • #4
yesmale4 said:
i was thinking that because impulse formula is J=F*(t-t0) and the force isn't constant then if i calculate the change in the force and multiply it by the change of time it will be alright
If a car drove at one speed for a while, slowed down to a different speed, then drove at that speed for a while, would you find the distance traveled by multiplying the change in speed by the time taken?
What if you were to increase the speed by 1m/s at all stages? You would calculate the same number. What if you increased the time at the higher speed and reduced the time at the lower speed by the same? Again, you would calculate the same number.
yesmale4 said:
i was not able to calculate the area between t = 12 to t= 28 because i don't undertand what kind of shpe it is , its not triangle
So cut it into simpler shapes.
 
  • #5
From t=10 s to t = 12 s the force is constant: F = 8 N
Can you do that part of the exercise ?

And: please use units

##\ ##
 

What is a graphical impulse calculation?

A graphical impulse calculation is a method used to determine the impulse, or change in momentum, of an object by analyzing a graph of the force applied to the object over time.

How is the impulse calculated from a force versus time graph?

The impulse can be calculated by finding the area under the force versus time graph. This can be done by dividing the graph into smaller shapes, such as rectangles or triangles, and then adding up the areas of each shape.

What is the significance of the slope of a force versus time graph?

The slope of a force versus time graph represents the acceleration of the object. This can be useful in determining the change in momentum and the impulse applied to the object.

Can a graphical impulse calculation be used for non-constant forces?

Yes, a graphical impulse calculation can still be used for non-constant forces. The area under the graph can be divided into smaller shapes to approximate the overall impulse, even if the force is changing over time.

How is a graphical impulse calculation used in real-world applications?

A graphical impulse calculation can be used in various fields such as physics, engineering, and sports. It can help analyze the impact of forces on objects, such as in car crashes or sports collisions, and can aid in designing safer equipment or structures.

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