Gravitational biot-savart-like force?

In summary, the Coulomb force and the Newtonian law of gravity share a similar structure, with both equations involving a product of two factors and an inverse square relationship. However, there is no equivalent magnetic force in gravitation. This concept has been explored, with an analogy between Maxwell's equations and Einstein's field equations being made. Further information on this can be found in the wiki article and arXiv mentioned above.
  • #1
Ulf
7
0
the coulomb force and the Newtonian law of gravity have the same structure:

[tex]F_C=\frac{q_1q_2}{R^2}[/tex] and [tex]F_G=\frac{m_1m_2}{R^2}[/tex].

so why isn't there an equivalent to the magnetic force in gravitation? so that one could imagine a law of the same structure as the biot-savart law for gravitation. is there something like that? and when not, why? what is so different in gravitation?
 
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  • #2
Such a concept has been discussed. In fact an analogy between Maxwell's equations and Einstein's field equations can be made, valid only under certain limiting conditions.

I don't know much about it, so I will leave any more in depth explanation for those more familiar with the material.

There is, however, a wiki article on the topic:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitomagnetism

and of course, the arXiv is great:

http://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/0311030
 
  • #3
Thank you G01! this is exactly what i was looking for. i wonder why this wasn't told in my introduction courses in physics, and none of my fellow students knew about that. guess i had to take the General Relativity course, to get to know about^^
 

1. What is the Gravitational biot-savart-like force?

The Gravitational biot-savart-like force is a theoretical concept in physics that describes the force between two objects with mass. It is similar to the Biot-Savart law in electromagnetism, which describes the magnetic field generated by a current-carrying wire.

2. How does the Gravitational biot-savart-like force differ from Newton's law of gravitation?

The Gravitational biot-savart-like force is a more general form of Newton's law of gravitation, which only applies to point masses. The biot-savart-like force takes into account the distribution of mass within an object, making it applicable to non-point masses as well.

3. Can the Gravitational biot-savart-like force be observed in real life?

Currently, there is no experimental evidence for the Gravitational biot-savart-like force. It is a theoretical concept that is still being studied and explored by scientists.

4. How is the Gravitational biot-savart-like force related to Einstein's theory of general relativity?

The Gravitational biot-savart-like force is a concept that arises from the mathematical framework of general relativity. It is a way of describing the gravitational force using the principles of curvature of spacetime and the distribution of mass and energy.

5. What are the potential applications of understanding the Gravitational biot-savart-like force?

Understanding the Gravitational biot-savart-like force could potentially lead to a better understanding of how gravity works on a larger scale, such as in the interactions between galaxies. It could also have implications for future developments in theories of gravity and could potentially aid in the search for a unified theory of physics.

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