Understanding Physical Processes: EM, Gravitational, Mechanical & Entropic

In summary, the conversation discusses the application of various theories, such as electromagnetic, gravitational, mechanical, and entropic processes, to physical phenomena. It is questioned whether all physical processes can be described by these theories, and it is concluded that there are certain phenomena that cannot be explained by electromagnetic forces, gravitational forces, or mechanical laws. It is also suggested that entropy covers the entirety of physical processes and that information theory has a close relationship with entropy. However, it is noted that information theory may include more than just physical things, while entropy specifically focuses on the link between information, matter, and energy. It is also mentioned that there may be cases where physical entities no longer have any interaction with one another that can be described by these theories.
  • #1
Hallucinogen
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Hi, I'm putting together some resources about theories and would like some help to make sure I don't make a mistake.

In particular, I'd like to know if each of the electromagnetic, gravitational, mechanical and entropic processes applies to every physical process.

So, for example, due to an event horizon, I understand that electromagnetic radiation cannot escape the interior of a black hole (hence I'm not referring to Hawking radiation), so therefore is it true not that all physical phenomena/bodies are interacting electromagnetically? The EM forces cannot take the matter inside the black hole and interact it with matter outside it, so there's a set of phenomena that can't be electromagnetic. If so, this would entail that not everything that is physical is electromagnetic, is that right?

I also have the same question about gravitaitonal forces and mechanical forces. Regarding gravitation: is it right that any two things that have energy/mass exert a gravitational force of some size on each other, so is there no entity in physics unaffected by gravitaitonal force? I read that very distant galaxies might not be encompassed by the same gravitaitonal field, is that right?

And for mechanics. I can't think of an example of any physical object or interaction or process that isn't governed by some mechanical description or law. If that's right, does it mean everything that is physical is mechanical, and vice versa? Ie. they are sets with the same elements?

This also seems true of entropy. Any physical process between physical entities appears to be considerable as an entropic process, so it seems to me that entropy covers the whole set of physical processes, is this right? Every known interaction in physics can be expressed in terms of entropic laws, correct?

While this is also true of information theory, information arguably includes more than physical things. There appears to be a close relationship between information theory and entropy, but the subject of entropy appears to specifically be the informational consideration of physical phenomena, ie. it seeks to understand the link between information, matter and energy. Is entropy circumscribed as such?

Many thanks for any help.
 
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  • #2
Or, for example, two galaxies that have exited each other's light cones and are accelerating away from one another faster than the speed of light due to cosmic expansion no longer have any interaction with one another that can be expressed in terms of EM or gravitation. Is that right?
 

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