Graviton Speed & Cherenkov Radiation Effects

In summary, Gravitons are hypothesized to travel at the speed of light and it is uncertain if there is an analogous effect to Cherenkov Radiation for gravitons due to the lack of negative gravitational charges. It is suggested that the speed of gravitational waves in a dense medium could potentially be measured by sending a massive body into the medium. However, it is not possible to replicate Cerenkov radiation with gravity due to the absence of negative gravitational charges.
  • #1
JustWatching
2
0
Hi All,
Can somebody tell me what's the speed of the Graviton?
As for Cherenkov Radiation, does exist a similar effect for Graviton?

Thanks
 
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  • #2
Gravitons are hypothesized to travel at c.

It is far from clear that you can make a medium where the conditions for Cerenkov radiation apply. (Actually, it is certain that there isn't, since there are no negative gravitational charges. What is less clear is if there is some sort of analogous effect)
 
  • #3
JustWatching said:
Hi All,
Can somebody tell me what's the speed of the Graviton?
As for Cherenkov Radiation, does exist a similar effect for Graviton?

Thanks

For that to occur, you would need to know what the speed of gravitational waves is in a dense medium and then send a massive body into that medium at a higher speed. Sounds like a but of advanced theoretical Physics to me.
But I think that Cherenkov Radiation relates to the wave speed and not the speed of photons.
 
  • #4
Vanadium 50 said:
Gravitons are hypothesized to travel at c.

It is far from clear that you can make a medium where the conditions for Cerenkov radiation apply. (Actually, it is certain that there isn't, since there are no negative gravitational charges. What is less clear is if there is some sort of analogous effect)
What do you mean that "it is certain that there isn't, since there are no negative gravitational charges." ?

sophiecentaur said:
For that to occur, you would need to know what the speed of gravitational waves is in a dense medium and then send a massive body into that medium at a higher speed. Sounds like a but of advanced theoretical Physics to me.
But I think that Cherenkov Radiation relates to the wave speed and not the speed of photons.
Wouldn't it be easier to just put a Big Mass inside a nuclear reactor, switch the reactor on/off, and measure any force applied to the mass in the two different situation?
 
  • #5
The reason you get Cerenkov radiation is because you have a particle traveling faster than light in that medium. The reason the speed of light is slower in media is because you have both positively and negatively electrically charged particles in that medium. There are no particles with negative gravitational charge - i.e. gravity is always attractive, never repulsive. So you can't duplicate the conditions that gave you Cerenkov radiation with gravity.
 
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Related to Graviton Speed & Cherenkov Radiation Effects

1. What is a graviton?

A graviton is a hypothetical particle that is believed to be the carrier of the force of gravity in quantum field theory. It is predicted by some theories, but has not yet been observed or confirmed.

2. How fast does a graviton travel?

The speed of a graviton is predicted to be the same as the speed of light, which is approximately 299,792,458 meters per second in a vacuum.

3. What is Cherenkov radiation?

Cherenkov radiation is a type of electromagnetic radiation that is emitted when a charged particle travels through a medium at a speed greater than the speed of light in that medium. It is often described as a glowing blue light.

4. How does Cherenkov radiation relate to graviton speed?

Cherenkov radiation is not directly related to graviton speed, as gravitons are believed to travel at the speed of light in a vacuum. However, the concept of particles traveling faster than the speed of light in a medium is similar to the concept of Cherenkov radiation.

5. Can Cherenkov radiation be used to detect gravitons?

No, Cherenkov radiation is not a suitable method for detecting gravitons. Gravitons are predicted to have very low energies and do not interact with electromagnetic radiation, so they cannot produce Cherenkov radiation. Other methods, such as gravitational wave detectors, are being used to try and detect gravitons.

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