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Having some Serious Trouble with Problem

  1. Oct 5, 2006 #1
    I having figuring out a problem gave me, but he won't tell me how to do it. Here's the problem "A small bead with mass M is attached to a very light string hung from a ceiling. The string can be torn by a force exceeding the value of 10 Mg where g is the acceleration due to gravity. The bead on the string may ocsillate harmonically with a period To. A student decides to perform another experiment. He takes the attached bead aside from its equilibrium and pushes it in such a way that the beaad performs a full revolution in a horizontal plane.
    What is the time of one revolution of the bead that can be calculated with teh data, given above? Is this time a maximum or minimum value of all possible?"

    I've looked all over the internet and text books trying to find examples with no success. I know that I need the period etc but I don't know how to apply them to getting the answer.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 5, 2006 #2
    Think about the shape of the path the bead will follow... (the type of motion) Drawing a free body diagram of the bead may help.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2006
  4. Oct 6, 2006 #3
    The motion would be constant right? And I been drawing FBS all over the place trying to figure this one out. Right now I know There's the Tension and Gravity and then the other force be Centripetal?
     
  5. Oct 6, 2006 #4
    Centripetal force isn't really a force, it's more the sum of all forces acting on an object directed towards the centre of the circular path. From the looks of it, I'd say that the centripetal force in this case is supplied by the tension force. If the plane it was rotating in was vertical, then the centripetal force would also be partially supplied by gravity in some cases.
     
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