Heat Capacity & Temperature Changes

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of heat capacity and its relation to changes in temperature. It is stated that adding the same amount of heat to two samples can result in different temperature increases due to differences in physical parameters. The formula Q = m*c*ΔT is given as a hint, with c representing heat capacity and m representing mass of the substance. The conversation also includes a problem involving a sample of metal with a given mass, the amount of heat supplied, and the change in temperature. It is asked to write down the heat capacity in terms of these variables, and then determine the temperature change when the amount of heat supplied is tripled. Finally, the conversation touches on a problem involving the amount of heat required to increase
  • #1
MrScorpion
3
0

Homework Statement



Quistions:

1-adding the same amount of heat to two samples does not produce the same increase in temperature. What physical parameters of hte bodies might be different?

2-We have a sample of metal with mass m. We supply an amount of heat Q and the temperature rises by deltaT.

(a) Write down the heat capacity of the sample in terms of m, Q and delta×T.

We increase the amount of heat supplied to the sample to 3Q

(b) What is the change in temperature?

(c)By what amount should we change the mass of the sample for the increase in temperature to be 10 deltaT?

3-We are going to increase the temperature of a sample of aluminium with mass 0.50kg. The initial temperature of the sampleis 300K. The final temperature is 400K. How much heat is required?

Homework Equations



1- (Hint: Q=m×c×deltaT)

3-(specific heat capacity of aluminium is 897 JKg^(-1)K^(-1)

The Attempt at a Solution



I don't know if the answers are correct or not

A1:The atoms. may be the first body is sold and the second bdy is liquid

A2:

(a) Q=m×deltaT

If we increase it to 3Q

==> 3Q=m×c×deltaT ==> Q=(m×deltaT)/3

(b) The change in temperature is deltaT = T2 - T1

(c) for this there is no attempt

A3:

Q=m×c×deltaT

==> 0.50 × 897 × (400 - 300 ) = 44850

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Please, please , please , and please i hope you to tell me what is the correct answer


i am trying allways to be a good student in physics but usually i don't answer quistions correctly.

please i hope you to teach me.

I will say thanks for you to the end of my life :smile:

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  • #2
You have written a hint: Q = m*c*ΔT.
In the problem Q and ΔT remain constant. Then which quarantines should be different for the two bodies?
 
  • #3
rl.bhat said:
You have written a hint: Q = m*c*ΔT.
In the problem Q and ΔT remain constant. Then which quarantines should be different for the two bodies?

First: thanks for your help

second:

The quarantines should be different for the two bodies are (c=heat capacity ,and m=mass of substance)

Is my answer right or not?



thanx again for your help:smile:
 
  • #4
Your answer is correct.
 
  • #5
rl.bhat said:
Your answer is correct.


Thank you

please:shy:, let's answer the remaining questions :redface: if you don't mind
 
  • #6
MrScorpion said:
2-We have a sample of metal with mass m. We supply an amount of heat Q and the temperature rises by deltaT.

(a) Write down the heat capacity of the sample in terms of m, Q and delta×T.

We increase the amount of heat supplied to the sample to 3Q

(b) What is the change in temperature?

(c)By what amount should we change the mass of the sample for the increase in temperature to be 10 deltaT?

3-We are going to increase the temperature of a sample of aluminium with mass 0.50kg. The initial temperature of the sampleis 300K. The final temperature is 400K. How much heat is required?

Homework Equations



1- (Hint: Q=m×c×deltaT)

3-(specific heat capacity of aluminium is 897 JKg^(-1)K^(-1)

The Attempt at a Solution



I don't know if the answers are correct or not

A1:The atoms. may be the first body is sold and the second bdy is liquid

A2:

(a) Q=m×deltaT
No, Q=m×c×deltaT as stated in the hint. Therefore c=____?

If we increase it to 3Q

==> 3Q=m×c×deltaT ==> Q=(m×deltaT)/3
This goes with part (b), not (a).
(b) The change in temperature is deltaT = T2 - T1
You are not understanding what is being asked.
The temperature change is deltaT when the amount of heat supplied is Q. If, instead, an amount of heat 3Q is added, what is the temperature change then?
(c) for this there is no attempt

A3:

Q=m×c×deltaT

==> 0.50 × 897 × (400 - 300 ) = 44850
This looks correct.
 

Related to Heat Capacity & Temperature Changes

1. What is heat capacity?

Heat capacity is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of a substance by one degree Celsius or Kelvin. It is a measure of how much heat a material can absorb without a significant change in temperature.

2. How is heat capacity related to temperature changes?

Heat capacity is directly related to temperature changes. The higher the heat capacity of a substance, the more heat energy is required to raise its temperature. Conversely, substances with lower heat capacities require less heat energy to experience a temperature change.

3. What factors affect the heat capacity of a substance?

The heat capacity of a substance is affected by its mass, chemical composition, and physical state. Generally, substances with higher molecular weights and more complex chemical structures have higher heat capacities. The physical state of a substance also plays a role, with gases having lower heat capacities than liquids or solids.

4. What is the difference between specific heat capacity and molar heat capacity?

Specific heat capacity is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of one gram of a substance by one degree Celsius or Kelvin. Molar heat capacity, on the other hand, is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of one mole of a substance by one degree Celsius or Kelvin. The molar heat capacity takes into account the number of particles in a substance, making it a more useful measure for chemical reactions.

5. How is heat capacity measured?

Heat capacity is typically measured using calorimetry, which involves measuring the change in temperature of a substance when a known amount of heat energy is added or removed. This can be done using a device called a calorimeter, which is designed to minimize heat loss and accurately measure temperature changes. The heat capacity of a substance can then be calculated using the measured temperature change and the amount of heat energy added or removed.

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