Help Understanding Circular Motion (1 Viewer)

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Hi there,

New to the forums, but have been periodically browsing posts as a guest. Anyways, I'm having trouble understanding and solving circular motion problems, but not finding angular velocities and what not, more so with respect to Newton's laws (forces). Such problems like uniform and non-uniform circular motion.

Is there a website that I could be directed to to learn more about these types of problems or possible advice from one of the members?

I understand how circular motion problems work, but I don't get how to set them up. My professor said something of summing the forces in the Z-direction and in the radial direction. I want to have some basic understanding of what he was saying before seeing him.
 
How about this chapter on circular motion from a book at lightandmatter.com - free science ebooks:

http://www.lightandmatter.com/html_books/1np/ch09/ch09.html [Broken]
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Hey, i'm rather new to the forums as well. From what i've seen, almost everyone goes to wikipedia. Try there.
 

ZapperZ

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
Insights Author
2018 Award
34,612
3,538
Hi there,

New to the forums, but have been periodically browsing posts as a guest. Anyways, I'm having trouble understanding and solving circular motion problems, but not finding angular velocities and what not, more so with respect to Newton's laws (forces). Such problems like uniform and non-uniform circular motion.

Is there a website that I could be directed to to learn more about these types of problems or possible advice from one of the members?

I understand how circular motion problems work, but I don't get how to set them up. My professor said something of summing the forces in the Z-direction and in the radial direction. I want to have some basic understanding of what he was saying before seeing him.
At the elementary level, I would recommend using https://www.physicsforums.com/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=1665022" [Broken].

Zz.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Doc Al

Mentor
44,641
966
I second ZapperZ's endorsement of the hyperphysics site. It's professional and reliable; for elementary stuff, it's always my first choice as a reference.

But if you're looking for an alternative to your own textbook, I also recommend the "lightandmatter" site that mikelepore gave. Ben Crowell has written an excellent set of physics textbooks which he makes available for free.
 

The Physics Forums Way

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top