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Help w/ Gravimetric Anaylsis of Mercury Oxide

  1. Apr 18, 2009 #1
    1. List the steps needed if a scientist is to use gravimetric analysis to find the percentage of mercury in a sample of mercury oxide.





    2. Dont really know how to do it but i know you must use fractional distillation, right? and then everything is a mystery. Help will be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 18, 2009 #2
    I don't think fractional distillation would be called gravimetric analysis. You should go for a heat to constant mass analysis.

    What do you know about mercury oxide when heated?
     
  4. Apr 18, 2009 #3

    Borek

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    Note: mercury is volatile.
     
  5. Apr 18, 2009 #4
    I am not sure what is heat to constant mass analysis because i have not learnt it yet and though question specifically says 'using gravimetric anaylsis' so I am confused.

    It expands and evaporates due a low boiling point, right?

    Thanks for all the replies at the moment.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2009
  6. Apr 19, 2009 #5

    Borek

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    No. It is solid. Solids don't boil.

    What is opposite of synthesis?
     
  7. Apr 20, 2009 #6
    Decomposition, so if we heat mercury we are removing the oxide [ions or molecules? sorry not v. good chemistry] leaving us w/ pure mercury? [ sorta of a random guess]

    I am sort of getting lost. Thanks anyways
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2009
  8. Apr 20, 2009 #7

    Borek

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    Decomposition - you are right. Problem is, what is produced is a mercury vapor, not liquid mercury.

    That's where the distillation may come handy. Once you have liquid mercury you can weight it...

    Note, that most likely no one will do it this way in the real lab.
     
  9. Apr 20, 2009 #8
    Great thanks for the info Borek, you have been a great help.
     
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