HELP with current in loops and solenoids

In summary, the conversation discusses creating a current loop with a specific magnetic field using a copper wire. The equation LB/UI = N is used to determine the number of turns needed, which is calculated to be 1438.28. The question remains about what to do next to solve the problem.
  • #1
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Homework Statement


You have a 1.1-m-long copper wire.You want to make an N-turn current loop that generates a 1.66 mT magnetic field at the center when the current is 1.01 A. You must use the entire wire. What will be the diameter of your coil?


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


I figured that this is a solenoid so I tried starting off by finding the number of turns it would take by using this equation...
LB/UI = N
The U is Mue 1.257x10^-6
I got 1438.28
but now I don't know what to do?
 
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  • #2
does anyone know what to do for this problem?
 
  • #3


Hello there,

It seems like you are on the right track in using the equation LB/UI = N to find the number of turns needed for your solenoid. To continue, you can use the formula for the magnetic field inside a solenoid, which is given by B = μ0NI/L, where μ0 is the permeability of free space, N is the number of turns, and L is the length of the solenoid.

Since you know the desired magnetic field (1.66 mT), current (1.01 A), and length of the wire (1.1 m), you can rearrange this equation to solve for the number of turns, N. Once you have the number of turns, you can use the formula for the circumference of a coil, C = 2πr, where r is the radius of the coil, to find the diameter of your coil.

I hope this helps. Good luck with your homework!
 

1. What is the concept of current in loops and solenoids?

The concept of current in loops and solenoids is related to the flow of electric charge. In a loop or solenoid, the current is caused by the movement of electrons through a conductor, such as a wire. This flow of electrons creates a magnetic field, which is used in many applications such as electromagnets and motors.

2. How is current calculated in a loop or solenoid?

Current is calculated using Ohm's Law, which states that current (I) is equal to voltage (V) divided by resistance (R). In a loop or solenoid, the resistance is dependent on the length, cross-sectional area, and material of the wire, while the voltage is determined by the power source connected to the circuit.

3. What is the difference between AC and DC current in loops and solenoids?

AC (alternating current) and DC (direct current) refer to the direction of current flow in a circuit. In a loop or solenoid, AC current changes direction periodically, while DC current flows in one direction. The type of current used in a loop or solenoid depends on the application and the desired effect on the magnetic field.

4. How does the number of loops affect the strength of the magnetic field in a solenoid?

The strength of the magnetic field in a solenoid is directly proportional to the number of loops. This means that increasing the number of loops will increase the strength of the magnetic field. However, other factors such as the length and diameter of the solenoid also play a role in determining the strength of the magnetic field.

5. Can the direction of the magnetic field in a solenoid be reversed?

Yes, the direction of the magnetic field in a solenoid can be reversed by changing the direction of the current flow. This can be achieved by reversing the polarity of the power source or by using a switch to change the direction of the current. Reversing the direction of the magnetic field in a solenoid can have various applications, such as in motors and speakers.

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