Hesitation -- Computer Science, Microengineering or Physics

In summary, the speaker is struggling to choose between studying computer science and microengineering. They enjoy programming and want to be a practical person, but fear they may not excel in engineering and may miss out on advanced math and physics if they choose microengineering. Ultimately, the speaker is interested in trying many things and is seeking advice on which major to pursue.
  • #1
lcq92
1
0
Hi,

I'm applying at a swiss univerity (EPFL) and I already have to pick my major.

Here's the thing :
I currently love programming. I enjoy finding beautiful ways to solve math programming challenges on the net. (I code in Python). I love automating stuff with programming. I love projects : I love having a current project that occupied my mind for some time, that I work hard to finish and that I can be proud of once it's accomplished. (I did a lot of 3D images with Blender partly for this reason)

But : if I go into the CS department, that means I'll never be able to understand electronics, or have engineering basics. The thing is, I would love to be a practical person. I admire the 'household-hacker' way of thinking. These persons that fix their tech themselves, that build their office desks themselves, that install gears and pulleys to dampen a violent door in their house. Basically people that make stuff, for personal use, that works.

That's why I was thinking of going into Microengineering : because it clearly is multidisciplinary. It has electronics, materials science, engineering, and some programming.

But I fear 2 things : First, I've always been clumsy, and not very practical. I want to learn the engineering stuff, but I fear I might suck at it.

Second, and more importantly : I fear I might miss on out advanced maths and physics. I know some people who studied classical physics, and work as researchers in fascinating topics (Quantum computing, Astronomy). And when I talk to them, I really tend to think that doing research is way more fulfilling and fascinating than being an engineer (and just coding software, for example)So there I am. I just can't decide between all these possibilities. I just want to do and try so many things. Thank you, if you read this !
 
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  • #2
Hi,

I'm applying at a swiss univerity (EPFL) and I already have to pick my major.

Here's the thing :
I currently love programming. I enjoy finding beautiful ways to solve math programming challenges on the net. (I code in Python). I love automating stuff with programming. I love projects : I love having a current project that occupied my mind for some time, that I work hard to finish and that I can be proud of once it's accomplished. (I did a lot of 3D images with Blender partly for this reason)

But : if I go into the CS department, that means I'll never be able to understand electronics, or have engineering basics. The thing is, I would love to be a practical person. I admire the 'household-hacker' way of thinking. These persons that fix their tech themselves, that build their office desks themselves, that install gears and pulleys to dampen a violent door in their house. Basically people that make stuff, for personal use, that works.

That's why I was thinking of going into Microengineering : because it clearly is multidisciplinary. It has electronics, materials science, engineering, and some programming.

But I fear 2 things : First, I've always been clumsy, and not very practical. I want to learn the engineering stuff, but I fear I might suck at it.

Second, and more importantly : I fear I might miss on out advanced maths and physics. I know some people who studied classical physics, and work as researchers in fascinating topics (Quantum computing, Astronomy). And when I talk to them, I really tend to think that doing research is way more fulfilling and fascinating than being an engineer (and just coding software, for example)So there I am. I just can't decide between all these possibilities. I just want to do and try so many things. Thank you, if you read this !

My simple and short recommendation is to see what you're mostly interested in and you're willing to spend your time and efforts on it, as all these you mention need different qualities as you go along the path. On the other hand, you must be sure to acquire a decent background if you need to go for a different major some time, as the job market(s) undergo rapid changes due to global economy factors.
 
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1. What is hesitation in the context of computer science, microengineering, or physics?

Hesitation refers to a delay or pause in the decision-making process, whether it be in the form of computation, engineering design, or physical movement. It can occur due to various factors such as uncertainty, lack of information, or conflicting options.

2. How does hesitation impact the progress of research in these fields?

Hesitation can have both positive and negative impacts on research. On one hand, it can lead to careful and thorough analysis, resulting in more accurate and reliable findings. On the other hand, it can also hinder progress and slow down the pace of development if it becomes excessive and causes delays.

3. Can hesitation be controlled or eliminated in these fields?

Yes, hesitation can be controlled or minimized through various strategies such as gathering more data, setting clear goals and criteria, and utilizing decision-making tools and techniques. However, it may not be possible to completely eliminate hesitation as it is a natural part of the scientific process.

4. How does hesitation impact the performance of computer systems or microdevices?

In computer systems, hesitation can lead to slower processing times and potentially affect the overall performance and efficiency. In microdevices, hesitation can affect their precision and accuracy, which is crucial in applications such as medical devices and nanotechnology.

5. What are some potential solutions to reduce hesitation in these fields?

Some potential solutions to reduce hesitation include utilizing advanced algorithms and technology, conducting thorough research and experimentation, and collaborating with experts in different fields to gain diverse perspectives. Additionally, setting realistic deadlines and creating a supportive and open-minded research environment can also help reduce hesitation.

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