Which MSc to do after BSc physics if you love to code?

In summary: Once you get out of the academic world, it might be challenging. But what I love above all is coding! Research is cool, but I just see myself procrastinating in it. It might be more useful to get a real job for a while, but it's a conundrum. Most people who did their PhD in experimental particle physics ended up in industry, using their programming and problem-solving skills. It may be possible to go directly from a BSc in physics to a specialized MSc in fields like Machine Learning or Data Science.
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Hi everyone!
Merry christmas first and I hope you're getting great rest with close ones around :)

Well, as title may suggest it, I will graduate soon in physics and I'm not sure of the next step in my academic curriculum.
I like theoretical physics, I've touched upon most fondamental physics topics, I also did 2 research-internships in condensed matter which lead to some publications.

But what I loved above all was coding: the computational projects, the simulations during my internships, using git, always coding something on my computer (even if it's LaTeX ..) – a good indicator might be the fact that for most homeworks/preparing exams/reading literature (publications) I was procrastinating so bad but for anything related to code, I was just delighted to getting started!

I know computer science is something drastically different with all the "computer theory" that we totally skip in physics.

I don't know if it's the correct name but I believe "applied computer science/applied mathematics" would be what I'm interested in. Now a Master degree in what field has this "applied/modeling" feature ? Big data ? Machine learning ?
I thought of a MSc in Computational physics but I don't know ... research is cool (it always was my first career-perspective) but way too boring/muddled and I can still get a PhD later on if I regret "normal work" ..

What do you guys think ?

Thank you!
 
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  • #2
Theoretical condensed matter physics & fluid dynamics comes to mind
 
  • #3
malawi_glenn said:
Theoretical condensed matter physics & fluid dynamics comes to mind
Thank you for your answer! But as I previously said, this is still research-oriented and, in an ideal world, would lead to a PhD. I was thinking of something more "direct" to the working world.
 
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I think it's significantly harder to start working then switch to a phd later, compared to starting a phd now and dropping out to work
 
  • #5
Fluid dynamics is good, I can't hire enough of them
 
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  • #6
Office_Shredder said:
I think it's significantly harder to start working then switch to a phd later, compared to starting a phd now and dropping out to work
But you will learn more useful stuff by getting a real job for a while. Its a conundrum. I would opt for the job but agree with @Office_Shredder analysis. You need to look deep here.
 
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Most of my friends who did their phd in experimental particle physics ended up in industry after graduation. Simply because their programming and problem solving skills became top notch. For instance one friend is at a medical company currently using AI to find optimal properties of certain drugs and pharmaceuticals. Another friend who is more inclined towards statistics is now working in life science. Despite that I myself am very good at programming and solving problems with a computer, I choose to pursue work as a teacher - simply because I love basic physics and interacting directly with people more.
 
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  • #8
Office_Shredder said:
I think it's significantly harder to start working then switch to a phd later, compared to starting a phd now and dropping out to work
You are probably right because PhD is kind of a big commitment, you know, 3-4 more years in full research mode .. Once you get out of the academic world, it might be challenging. But as I said, what I love above all is coding! Research on the other hand is cool but I just see myself procrastinating in it xD

Dr Transport said:
Fluid dynamics is good, I can't hire enough of them
Wow, in which field do you work if that's not too much asking ?

hutchphd said:
But you will learn more useful stuff by getting a real job for a while. Its a conundrum. I would opt for the job but agree with @Office_Shredder analysis. You need to look deep here.
I see ... I'll try to find a more practical internship in the industry during the next months and see if it helps me decide.

malawi_glenn said:
Most of my friends who did their phd in experimental particle physics ended up in industry after graduation. Simply because their programming and problem solving skills became top notch. For instance one friend is at a medical company currently using AI to find optimal properties of certain drugs and pharmaceuticals. Another friend who is more inclined towards statistics is now working in life science. Despite that I myself am very good at programming and solving problems with a computer, I choose to pursue work as a teacher - simply because I love basic physics and interacting directly with people more.
Thank you for such a great enlightenment! Transitioning after PhD requires a long road for my present me .. do you think going right from a BSc physics to a MSc in specialized fields such as Machine Learning, Data Science, etc. a conceivable thing ?
 
  • #10
yezia said:
You are probably right because PhD is kind of a big commitment, you know, 3-4 more years in full research mode .. Once you get out of the academic world, it might be challenging. But as I said, what I love above all is coding! Research on the other hand is cool but I just see myself procrastinating in it xD
I actually mean more, to get into school you need letters of recommendation, you need to convince the school you're in for a 5 year commitment, and you need to make sure your physics skills are all sharp. These are all tough after working a couple years. I think you should probably just work, but don't fool yourself into thinking going back to a phd is a question of your own willpower. Getting into a program is not easy, and you will never be better positioned to get into one than you are now, unless you get a specific kind of job.
 
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  • #11
Office_Shredder said:
I actually mean more, to get into school you need letters of recommendation, you need to convince the school you're in for a 5 year commitment, and you need to make sure your physics skills are all sharp. These are all tough after working a couple years. I think you should probably just work, but don't fool yourself into thinking going back to a phd is a question of your own willpower. Getting into a program is not easy, and you will never be better positioned to get into one than you are now, unless you get a specific kind of job.
Wow that's deeper than I thought ^^
 

1. What are the best MSc programs for someone with a background in physics and a love for coding?

Some of the best MSc programs for individuals with a background in physics and a love for coding include Computational Physics, Scientific Computing, Data Science, Computer Science, and Applied Mathematics.

2. Can I pursue an MSc in Computer Science after completing a BSc in Physics?

Yes, many universities offer MSc programs in Computer Science specifically for individuals with a background in Physics. However, you may need to have some prior knowledge or experience in coding to be eligible for these programs.

3. Are there any MSc programs that combine both Physics and Coding?

Yes, there are some MSc programs that offer a combination of Physics and Coding, such as Computational Physics, Scientific Computing, or Data Science with a focus on Physics applications.

4. Will an MSc in Computer Science be beneficial for a career in Physics?

Yes, an MSc in Computer Science can be highly beneficial for a career in Physics, especially in fields such as data analysis, computational modeling, and scientific programming.

5. What skills should I have to excel in an MSc program that involves both Physics and Coding?

To excel in an MSc program that combines Physics and Coding, it is important to have a strong foundation in both subjects. Additionally, skills in data analysis, problem-solving, and programming languages such as Python, MATLAB, or C++ can be helpful.

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