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Higgs Mass and Other Particles

  1. Jul 6, 2012 #1
    If the Higgs boson imparts mass to other particles, does it not itself lose mass and energy in the process? As it does its thing, could not the Higgs than transform itself to a different particle, one that may have already been seen, perhaps down to a point particle with no mass?
     
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  3. Jul 6, 2012 #2

    tiny-tim

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    the higgs field imparts mass to other particles :wink:

    btw, can anyone tell me …

    what imparts charge to charged particles?? :confused:
     
  4. Jul 6, 2012 #3
    Good question, along with: what imparts spin,.... any property to particles?
    I think the key here is that charge of the particles didn't break the symmetry of the SM as masses did. But someone who actually know about particle physics should clarify it.
     
  5. Jul 6, 2012 #4

    tiny-tim

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    ah, i see someone else has started a thread on this …
     
  6. Jul 6, 2012 #5
    The most easy to understand answer (and admittedly it's only a beginning) is that in Yukawa theory the meson carries the charge between the proton and neutron or vice versa.

    Yukawa's Noble prize lecture:
    www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/.../yukawa-lecture.pdf [Broken]

    Deeper of course is how fractions of a charge are exchanged in QCD and the theory of Quarks and how spins are involved
     
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  7. Jul 6, 2012 #6

    tiny-tim

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  8. Jul 6, 2012 #7
    OK. Please explain to me the difference between the Higgs boson/particle and the Higgs field.

    In a video for laymen (of which I am one), Daniel Whiteson (an experimental physicist working at CERN) said "The Higgs is the particle responsible for giving mass to other particles." Hence the genesis of my original question in this thread.
     
  9. Jul 6, 2012 #8

    tiny-tim

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    the higgs particle is a particle, the higgs field is a field :confused:
    do you mean the video made with jorge cham of phd comicsm, at http://io9.com/daniel-whiteson/ ?

    yes, at http://www.phdcomics.com/higgs/index.php?page=6 he says that it's the higgs particle

    but immediately after that, at http://www.phdcomics.com/higgs/index.php?page=7 he says that it's the higgs field
     
  10. Jul 6, 2012 #9
    I take it you don't know the difference either.

    That was the basis for my question raised in this post.

    I await an answer from a more knowledgeable responder.
     
  11. Jul 6, 2012 #10
    Isn't a particle just a small packet or excited state of a field? Wouldnt that mean that the Higgs particle IS the Higgs field in a local state of excitement?

    Sorry, I'm not a physicist, just interrested.
     
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