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Homework Help: Hmmmm how to find the taylor series based @ b for this function?

  1. Oct 8, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    1/(4x-5) - z/(3x-2) based @ 0, answers are in those z things.. sigma

    2. Relevant equations
    i think we use sigma of e^x, but idk how...


    3. The attempt at a solution
    since tayor sereis of e^x is like 1/x, do i plug 4x-5 in?

    thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 8, 2008 #2

    Dick

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I really don't understand that. Is that a function of two variables, x and z?
     
  4. Oct 8, 2008 #3
    haha.... no i don't know how "z" got in there... the question is asking us to find the taylor series by using like e^x, sin x, or 1/(1-x) taylor series...
    idk if that's making sense ...
     
  5. Oct 8, 2008 #4

    Dick

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    Then use things like 1/(1-x)=1+x+x^2+... You can expand inverse linear functions like 1/(ax+b) as a power series.
     
  6. Oct 9, 2008 #5

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    You didn't ask my opinion, but I'll give it to you anyway, for free. I think you're in a class that's way over your head. You don't seem to be able to tell us what the problem is, and I don't believe you have any idea what a Taylor's series is. Much of what you've written makes no sense ("sigma of e^x", "answers are in those z things ... sigma").

    Mark
     
  7. Oct 9, 2008 #6
    haha :D you are kind of right... i learned this stuff but i'm trying to refresh my memory... and as for the "z things" i was just trying to be stupid...
    thanks for the advice tho... and i do know what a taylor series is.. i think.
    (is it to approximate another function at a point?)
    i think thats what it is.


    edit: lol ", for free." XD
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2008
  8. Oct 9, 2008 #7
    ahh thanks!
     
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