Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

B How do I calculate electron acceleration by gravitational waves

  1. Aug 20, 2016 #1
    If the amplitude of gravitational waves, frequency of gravitational waves and the vector potential of magnetic field in surrounding of such waves are known then what would be the easiest way to calculate resultant acceleration of electrons?

    My above question is based on the various researches around particle acceleration by gravity waves in neighborhood of magnetic neutral sheet

    (http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0312151.pdf -one of the researches.)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 23, 2016 #2

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Doesn't the paper itself take you through the calculation methods in section 2?
     
  4. Aug 24, 2016 #3
    I wanted to code the whole formula and then keep trying with various values. There are few unknown parameters in the equations and I am unable to pinpoint the correct equation. Please Help
     
  5. Aug 24, 2016 #4

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    He says the equations of motion are Eqn. (10). What more do you need?
     
  6. Aug 25, 2016 #5

    Input would only be amplitude of gravity waves, frequency of gravity waves and vector potential of magnetic field. Now what would be the parameters for equation no. 10 and would it be enough for calculating accelerating electron or do I have to use other equations to get result from given input? As I said before I dont have any background in physics
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2016
  7. Aug 25, 2016 #6

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    Where did you say this? By making this thread an A, you said you wanted an answer at the graduate level.

    Eqn. (10) is the answer. If you don't have the background to use the answer, I am not sure how we can help you.
     
  8. Sep 30, 2016 #7
    http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/..._paper=YES&type=PRINTER&filetype=.pdf


    equation no. 2b is used to calculate acceleration of particles. I am trying to solve it in hypothetical situation and want to know if following parameters taken are correct. (I am looking to get particle acceleration in meters per second)

    Unperturbed velocity: some basic assumption in meters per second
    Larmor frequency:In hertz
    Wave frequency: In hertz
    X3 : assumed direction in degrees
    arbitary phase constant: again some assumption in meters per second
    amplitude: in decibels(calculated with distance traveled in meters)

    now are my parameters correct? and what is c and t ?
     
  9. Sep 30, 2016 #8

    Demystifier

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    This should be obvious to anybody with some education in college physics. Are you saying that you are interested in this highly specialized physics paper without having any education in college physics?
     
  10. Sep 30, 2016 #9
    I do not have any formal education. I am learning everything on need to know basis for this paper. Can you pleasr help?
     
  11. Oct 1, 2016 #10

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I'm sorry to say, but you will get nowhere with that approach. Without a good foundation in basic physics, it is impossible to understand such an article. Worse yet, you may think you understand without understanding.
     
  12. Oct 1, 2016 #11

    Agreed. But could you please answer my question?
     
  13. Oct 1, 2016 #12

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I'll answer your questions, hoping for you to see that your are in over your head

    These are angular frequencies, so in s-1, but not hertz

    It's not an angle, it is a position along a coordinate axis.

    α and a are dimensionless.

    c is the speed of light and t is time.

    Look, you can't even do dimensional analysis to see if the units make sense. This is hopeless. Learn to walk before you run.
     
  14. Oct 1, 2016 #13

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    This will be the end of this thread. OP, please learn physics properly before trying to make such calculations.

    Thread closed.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: How do I calculate electron acceleration by gravitational waves
  1. How do electrons move? (Replies: 17)

Loading...