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How do I transfer propane between two similar sized cylinders?

  1. Aug 10, 2014 #1
    Hi, I made a metal cylinder that is the SAME size as my 400g propane cylinder (picture: https://2ecffd01e1ab3e9383f0-07db7b...x800/7a66c8cb-d697-4680-9321-fcb73ede75c9.jpg). I want to transfer ALL (or almost all) of the propane from the propane cylinder to my metal cylinder, preferably without using an air compressor or something like that. The reason why I'm doing this is because I'm building a rocket and I can't get the propane to flow out of the propane cylinder fast enough. Thanks :D
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 10, 2014 #2

    Baluncore

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    Science Advisor

    Welcome to PF.
    Unfortunately, PF has a policy of not supporting Illegal & Dangerous Activities. General questions about transferring volatile liquids may be answered, but here you are building a dangerous device / weapon, with a reactive fuel, in a non-certified tank.

    Now that you have identified the application and fuel, PF cannot assist you, other than to advise you not to do it.
     
  4. Aug 10, 2014 #3
    I think Goddard used gasoline as a fuel for launch. And kerosine was used by Nasa at a time, perhaps Apollo. But safety protocols had to have been in place to minimize the level of risk. As far as I know Goddard did not blow himself up.

    Your best bet would be to consult the rocketeer sites for best practices as many things can go wrong, and you will not have a chance to get out of the way if it does. Propane is not, if ever as far as I can tell, used as one of the preferred fuels for amateur rockets. Could be because of pitfalls with leaky plumbing as one reason.

    I would go with another type of fuel that more people have had experience with, especially since this sounds like your first rocket project.
     
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