How Do Support Reactions Affect 2D Static Equilibrium in a Shopping Cart?

In summary, the conversation revolves around forming 2d static equilibrium equations for a shopping cart and the confusion surrounding the support reactions. The speaker is unsure about whether to analyze the basket as a fixed frame or not and is seeking help on whether to include a force from C to A. The other person suggests dividing the cart into components and considering external forces, while ignoring internal forces. The conversation also touches on the concept of adding a column between points B and E and its effect on the 2d static equilibrium equation.
  • #1
muna
3
0
Thread moved from the technical forums to the schoolwork forums
Hey guys, help me out a bit here. I want to form 2d static equilibrium equations for a shopping cart. This is for an assignment. I'm kind of confused about the support reactions. I'm not sure how I should analyze the basket. I was going with A as a fixed support (see image) since I'm guessing the weight fw and load fl will create moments there but I don't know if that makes sense since the whole thing seems like a fixed frame but I'm not sure if I should analyze it as a frame. I know for sure D and E would be have one reaction force each as they are roller supports. Also I don't know if a force should be acting from C to A. I would really appreciate some help here because there is just a lot I don't understand about these topics.
Screenshot 2021-11-21 134203.png
 
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  • #2
It's up to you to decide what components to divide it into. Once you have done that you can consider the forces acting on each component, but ignore forces acting within them.
 
  • #3
haruspex said:
It's up to you to decide what components to divide it into. Once you have done that you can consider the forces acting on each component, but ignore forces acting within them.
Okay so I can just look at A as a fixed support? And should I include a force from C to A?
 
  • #4
muna said:
Also I don't know if a force should be acting from C to A.
When you say "static equilibrium", do you mean there are no other forces acting on the cart except for its own weight?
 
  • #5
berkeman said:
When you say "static equilibrium", do you mean there are no other forces acting on the cart except for its own weight?
Yes, and a load which acts at the same point as its weight. Okay I see what you are saying. If I include a force there I would probably be an internal force. But would you happen to know if the trolley's basket should be looked at as a fixed support?
 
  • #6
muna said:
Okay so I can just look at A as a fixed support? And should I include a force from C to A?
As I posted, first decide which components to divide it into. I can’t answer that question until you have done that.
 
  • #7
If you weld a column between points B and E, how that changes the 2d static equilibrium equation (for the whole cart, I guess) that you want to form?
 

Related to How Do Support Reactions Affect 2D Static Equilibrium in a Shopping Cart?

1. What is the definition of "forces" in relation to a static shopping cart?

Forces refer to the external influences or factors that affect the motion or stability of a static shopping cart. These forces can include gravity, friction, and applied forces from the environment or the cart's contents.

2. How does gravity affect a static shopping cart?

Gravity is a downward force that pulls objects towards the center of the Earth. This force acts on the shopping cart, causing it to exert a downward force on the ground and preventing it from floating or flying away.

3. What role does friction play in the stability of a static shopping cart?

Friction is the resistance between two surfaces in contact with each other. In the case of a shopping cart, friction between the wheels and the ground helps to keep the cart in place and prevents it from sliding or rolling away.

4. Can applied forces from the environment affect a static shopping cart?

Yes, applied forces from the environment such as wind or uneven ground can affect the stability of a static shopping cart. For example, a strong gust of wind can cause the cart to tip over if it is not properly secured.

5. How does the weight and distribution of items in a shopping cart impact the forces acting on it?

The weight and distribution of items in a shopping cart can affect the forces acting on it. If the weight is unevenly distributed, it can cause the cart to tilt or tip over. Additionally, a heavier load will increase the downward force on the wheels, making it more difficult to move the cart.

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