How do you cope with not knowing?

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  • #26
Monique
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Just imagine, what you would have been awed by, were you 30 years older.

Guess what this image is:

pre.hubble.crab.nebula.jpg

And guess what I just scanned the image from.
Well, the url says it's the pre hubble crab nebula :wink: Not sure where you scanned it from, it could've been *gasp* ... a book! Now a days we can search images, so maybe this one? https://www.amazon.com/dp/0387307346/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20

But no kidding, I saw personal computers enter the house hold (running on cassette tapes), now we all have "super computers" in our pockets like it is nothing. I love it :biggrin: And internet, such a novel thing and I'm so happy I'm there to use it!
 
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  • #27
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But no kidding, I saw personal computers enter the house hold (running on cassette tapes), now we all have "super computers" in our pockets like it is nothing. I love it :biggrin: And internet, such a novel thing and I'm so happy I'm there to use it!
There was never a time for me when we didn't have a computer in the house but I remember floppy drives, cassettes, vcr tapes and the first mobile with a camera! I wonder what the future will bring. Imagine if we bought Faraday back from the dead now, look at what his discovery has made possible yet he never had the chance to experience any of it.

But on the flip side I am uttery greatful for great people that have come before me and allowed me to type this very message to you now, to capture my favorite event on camera, to speak to a friend on a mobile in a matter of seconds and all the other wonderous things.

I feel a little bit like a criminal... they did all the hard work and here I am enjoying the rewards without having contributed at all. All I'm saying is it's a shame that some of the people which made possible all these things, never actually got the chance to experience them.
 
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  • #28
Choppy
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Sure, there are things that I'm not likely to see. I don't know that I get all that upset over things that I'm unlikely to know because I don't know what problems will be solved later today, let alone in my lifetime. I can make educated guesses, but they're only guesses and there's no real point in worrying over that.

Some things I'd really like to see happen (assuming they are possible):
1. The accumulation of evidence for extra-terrestrial life.
2. Significant advances in the treatment of diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's.
3. The implementation of non-violent and sustainable solutions to world over-population.
 
  • #29
OmCheeto
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Well, the url says it's the pre hubble crab nebula :wink:
:thumbs:
Not sure where you scanned it from, it could've been *gasp* ... a book!
:thumbs: (1990 edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. I couldn't find a pre-Hubble image on the internets)
Now a days we can search images, so maybe this one? https://www.amazon.com/dp/0387307346/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20

But no kidding, I saw personal computers enter the house hold (running on cassette tapes)
:bugeye:
O.M.G. I thought you were about 25 years old. My first two computers ran on cassette tapes!

, now we all have "super computers" in our pockets like it is nothing. I love it :biggrin: And internet, such a novel thing and I'm so happy I'm there to use it!
:thumbs:

ditto kid. ditto.

ps. I mentioned the Crab Nebula because, when I first saw the Hubble images, I didn't recognize it. I was like Jodi Foster, blubbering, and laughing, from Contact.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3deNVM3EWIc​

Some......celestial event...
No…no words.
No words......to describe it.
Poetry.
They should have sent......a poet.
It's so beautiful.
Beautiful.
So beautiful.
So beautiful.
I had no idea.
I had no idea.
I had no idea.
I had no idea.​
I wonder if Galileo giggled, nervously, when he discovered the satellites, of Jupiter.

I imagine, that he did.

:smile:
 
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  • #30
Monique
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:thumbs:

:thumbs: (1990 edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. I couldn't find a pre-Hubble image on the internets)
I used to have a floppy disk with (part of) Encyclopædia Britannica on it, I always wanted to buy the books because it would be awesome to have all that knowledge. Now there is the internet :smile:

:bugeye:
O.M.G. I thought you were about 25 years old. My first two computers ran on cassette tapes!
Add 8 years to that :smile: I'm 33, the other day a sales person on the street asked me "are you living on your own already?" Implying he doubted if I was still living with my parents :rolleyes: The first game console our family had was Pong, you connected this thing to the television screen and then you could play a primitive form of tennis. Then we obtained a personal computer that ran on cassette tapes. Lately at my work I'm hearing people say "if you used this [genetics] technology, you're ancient". So, it's official: I'm ancient.

:thumbs:

ditto kid. ditto.

ps. I mentioned the Crab Nebula because, when I first saw the Hubble images, I didn't recognize it. I was like Jodi Foster, blubbering, and laughing, from Contact.
At first I didn't recognize your image, it's wonderful how much more detailed the images have become.
 
  • #31
OmCheeto
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I used to have a floppy disk with (part of) Encyclopædia Britannica on it, I always wanted to buy the books because it would be awesome to have all that knowledge. Now there is the internet :smile:

Add 8 years to that :smile: I'm 33, the other day a sales person on the street asked me "are you living on your own already?" Implying he doubted if I was still living with my parents :rolleyes: The first game console our family had was Pong, you connected this thing to the television screen and then you could play a primitive form of tennis. Then we obtained a personal computer that ran on cassette tapes. Lately at my work I'm hearing people say "if you used this [genetics] technology, you're ancient". So, it's official: I'm ancient.

At first I didn't recognize your image, it's wonderful how much more detailed the images have become.
Yay!

You just made my day. :smile:

33, and ancient.... :rofl:

computer.youre.paper.tape.jpg

:tongue:
 
  • #32
Monique
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I've never used punch cards, I'm not THAT old :biggrin: :rofl:
 
  • #33
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And what do cosmologists study? For example, look at the various papers on cosmology. Do you think each of these papers describes our entire universe? Or do they specifically focus on a particular phenomenon or description? Dark energy isn't "The Universe", for example. Yet, there are papers on the various theoretical properties of DE, etc. This is not "The Universe"!

It's like claiming that you study the whole cow, when all you're looking at is the hoof.

Zz.
Reminds me of a quote from Mr, Newton and others:-


“I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the shore now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.” Live your life as an Exclamation rather than an Explanation.
 
  • #34
reenmachine
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It is indeed frustrating knowing that you will not know the answers to the mysteries of the universe.Even worst , you probably won't know a single thing completely because everything is endlessly complicated.This is especially frustrating when you're an extremely curious person.

But beyond that frustration , I have to say that I prefer a universe filled with mysteries and answers to discover than a universe where everything is known.That great feeling of discovering something exists because there are many deep mysteries waiting to be solved.To me , mysteries give life all it's flavors (granted this is a weird metaphor but that's what spontaneously came to my mind).
 
  • #35
jim hardy
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Yay!

You just made my day. :smile:

33, and ancient.... :rofl:

computer.youre.paper.tape.jpg

:tongue:
You just made mine !

You can repair a "broken" file on that medium with Scotch tape and a toothpick. We've both no doubt done it, too.

We ran an ASR33 until 1990. You probably had KSR's in the military.
 
  • #36
AlephZero
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"Paper" paper tape was the wimpy stuff. I've still got some of the oil-and-waterproof tape we used to use for numerical controlled machine tools, before "NC" turned into "CNC".

attachment.php?attachmentid=70469&stc=1&=1402346002.jpg


Those old paper tape punches were indestructible. I remember once coming into the tape duplicating room and finding one that had vibrated itself off its table and was still working away upside down on the floor.

We once gave some apprentices a "design and make" project to build a tape splicing block. They did a pretty good job, except for one small design flaw. They built it to last for ever, out of solid stainless steel, and it weighed about 20 pounds!
 

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  • #37
OmCheeto
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You just made mine !

You can repair a "broken" file on that medium with Scotch tape and a toothpick. We've both no doubt done it, too.

We ran an ASR33 until 1990. You probably had KSR's in the military.
"ASR33 until 1990"? :eek: Good god!

I used an ASR33 for one term during my sophomore year in high school, circa 1975. There were no more computer classes offered after that........ :mad:

When I got to my submarine in 1979, they were up to hub-cap sized floppies, an IBM Selectric style keyboard, and no paper.

Within a year or two, I was the first person on the ship to have purchased their own PC. Which for all the young kids out there, did not mean "A Microsoft machine" (vs "An Apple").
It meant; "MY OWN PERSONAL COMPUTER!"

argh.

ps.

Wilbur and Orville Wright's First Flight
December 17, 1903
"For some years, I have been afflicted with the belief that flight is possible to man. My disease has increased in severity and I feel that it will soon cost me an increased amount of money if not my life." Three years after Wilbur Wright wrote those words, he and his brother Orville put their belief in flight to the test in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina.

Did their attempt to fly an airplane they had built in sections in the back room of their Dayton, Ohio bicycle shop cost Wilbur his life?...
According to wiki, 8 of the surviving oldest 100 people, ever, were born before we hadn't even had powered flight.

And there I got to sit, as a 10 year old, watch us become actual space travelers.

pps. I was 11 when I got to take my first flight on a 747. As I recall, it was a big deal when those planes were introduced.
 
  • #38
OmCheeto
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I've never used punch cards, I'm not THAT old :biggrin: :rofl:
Yes, we determined that. :wink:

Punched "card"

I'd seen punch cards, but was about a year or two too old to have actually had to use them.

Take that, really, really old dudes! :tongue2:
 
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  • #39
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Yes, we determined that. :wink:

Punched "card"

I'd seen punch cards, but was about a year or two too old to have actually had to use them.

Take that, really, really old dudes! :tongue2:
So did you ever bend, fold, spindle, or mutilate a punch card??
 
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  • #40
jim hardy
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Punch cards? You bet we mutilated them with creative "Go To" statements.

Way back when i was in college , like 1964, gasoline company credit machines used half size punch cards with carbon paper for the receipt. You signed it, kept the top sheet of paper and at month's end the company's computer mailed the punch cards to you along with with your bill.
Well, gas was around 25 cents a gallon in Missouri. I had Dad's credit card for emergencies so for a lark charged a tank of gas for my motorcycle, It was around forty-five cents...
I wrote "Hi Dad" on the back of the punch card,
when the bill arrived he took the punch card to work to show off as "A letter from my kid in college".

You know, they just don't make nostalgia like they used to.

old jim
 
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  • #41
D H
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So did you ever bend, fold, spindle, or mutilate a punch card??
Yes.

Do you remember why some of these decks have a diagonal line(s) drawn on them?

541px-PunchCardDecks.agr.jpg
 
  • #42
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If the cards were dropped the lines on the sides helped to put them back in order.


OK I cheated. I found it on a blog. It is an interesting blog about old computer technology, or I should say this page of it is.

http://mike-duncombe.blogspot.com/2012/12/living-in-future.html

I was in underground missile silos during that time frame. It seems to me my monthly pay checks were punch cards. We loaded targeting information into the guidance systems using that wonderful punched paper tape someone mentioned.

http://blog.nuclearsecrecy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Titan-II-targeting-tape.jpg
 

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