How do you find the determinant

In summary, the conversation discusses methods for finding the value of a in a system of equations that will result in no solution. The suggested methods include finding the determinant and solving for a, as well as using elimination methods to determine values of a that make it impossible to solve the equation. There is also a clarification that there is no specific value of a for which there will be no solution, but rather a value that will result in either no solution or an infinite number of solutions. Additionally, it is mentioned that making the matrix singular can affect the number of solutions. The conversation also briefly touches on the conditions for two straight lines to not intersect.
  • #1
Ry122
565
2
http://users.on.net/~rohanlal/11Untitled.jpg
How do I find the value of a for which there will be no solution?
Do you find the determinant, equate it to 0 and solve for a?
 
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  • #2
One perfectly good method would be to try to solve that system of equations by the usual "elimination" methods (I would be inclined to subtract one equation from the other) and see what values of a make it impossible to solve the equationl (For example, you can't divide by 0.)

By the way, the question (which I notice is NOT part of the copied statement) is not well phrased. The is NO value of a "for which there will be no solution". There is a value of a for which either there is no solution or there are an infinite number of solutions, depending on b.
 
  • #3
by making a 1 you are making the matrix cingular because the row vectors are now linearlly dependent. I think the method you're using should work also... You would get
a-1 = 0...
 
  • #4
Ry122 said:
http://users.on.net/~rohanlal/11Untitled.jpg
How do I find the value of a for which there will be no solution?
Do you find the determinant, equate it to 0 and solve for a?

Two straight lines will always intersect except if what about the lines are the same?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

1. How do you calculate the determinant of a matrix?

The determinant of a matrix is calculated by using a specific formula that involves the elements of the matrix. The size of the matrix determines the number of steps required to calculate the determinant. For a 2x2 matrix, the formula is ad-bc, where a, b, c, and d are the elements of the matrix. For larger matrices, the formula is more complex and involves finding the determinants of submatrices.

2. Why is finding the determinant important?

The determinant of a matrix is important in many areas of mathematics, physics, and engineering. It is used to solve systems of linear equations, calculate the area and volume of geometric shapes, and determine if a matrix is invertible. It is also helpful in understanding the properties of a matrix and its transformations.

3. What does the determinant tell us about a matrix?

The determinant of a matrix can tell us a lot about its properties. It can tell us if the matrix is invertible or singular, which is important in solving systems of equations. It can also tell us if the matrix is a scaling or reflection matrix, and if it preserves or changes orientation. The determinant also gives us information about the area or volume of the geometric shape represented by the matrix.

4. Can the determinant of a matrix be negative?

Yes, the determinant of a matrix can be negative. The sign of the determinant depends on the number of row swaps that are required to reduce the matrix to its upper triangular form. If an even number of row swaps are needed, the determinant will be positive. If an odd number of row swaps are needed, the determinant will be negative.

5. Are there any shortcuts or tricks for finding the determinant?

There are a few shortcuts and tricks that can be used to find the determinant of a matrix. For example, if a matrix has a row or column of zeros, the determinant is automatically 0. Also, if a matrix has identical rows or columns, the determinant is 0. Additionally, there are some rules for finding the determinant of a 3x3 matrix that can make the calculations easier and faster.

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