How Do You Solve Newton's Force Problem with Given Mass and Acceleration?

  • Thread starter oggorilla
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Force
In summary, Newton's Force Problem is a physics problem introduced by Sir Isaac Newton that involves determining the acceleration of an object based on the forces acting upon it. It is based on three laws of motion, which state that objects at rest will stay at rest unless acted upon by an external force, force is equal to mass times acceleration, and for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. To solve the problem, one must identify all the forces acting on the object and use Newton's second law to calculate the net force and acceleration. This concept can be applied to real-world situations, but it has limitations such as assuming constant forces and straight-line motion, which may lead to inaccuracies.
  • #1
oggorilla
1
0
http://pub.undergroundave.com/ed/misc/pprob.jpg

my answers and the correct answers don't match up. if someone could show me step by step how i should go about solving it that would be koo.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
a) What is the maximum static friction force that can be placed on the 10 kg mass? What force F produces that force on the 10 kg mass?

b) Using F = ma where m is the total mass, you should be able to determine the acceleration. Hint: The pulley has no bearing on part b).

AM
 
  • #3


I would approach Newton's Force Problem by first understanding the basic principles of Newton's Laws of Motion. These laws state that an object at rest will remain at rest unless acted upon by an external force, and an object in motion will continue to move at a constant velocity unless acted upon by an external force.

In this specific problem, we are given the mass of the object (m = 5kg) and the acceleration it experiences (a = 4m/s^2). Using Newton's Second Law, which states that force (F) equals mass (m) times acceleration (a), we can calculate the force acting on the object.

F = m * a
F = 5kg * 4m/s^2
F = 20N

Therefore, the force acting on the object is 20N.

It is important to note that this is a simplified version of the problem, as there may be other forces acting on the object that are not mentioned in the given information. In order to fully solve this problem, we would need to take into account all the forces acting on the object and use vector analysis to determine the net force and its direction.
 

Related to How Do You Solve Newton's Force Problem with Given Mass and Acceleration?

1. What is Newton's Force Problem?

Newton's Force Problem is a physics problem that involves determining the acceleration of an object based on the forces acting upon it. It was first introduced by Sir Isaac Newton as part of his laws of motion.

2. What are the three laws of motion that Newton's Force Problem is based on?

The three laws of motion are: 1) an object at rest will stay at rest and an object in motion will stay in motion unless acted upon by an external force, 2) the force acting on an object is equal to its mass multiplied by its acceleration, and 3) for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.

3. How do you solve Newton's Force Problem?

To solve Newton's Force Problem, you will need to identify all the forces acting on the object in question, including gravity, friction, and any other external forces. Then, using Newton's second law of motion, you can calculate the net force and use it to determine the acceleration of the object.

4. Can Newton's Force Problem be applied to real-world situations?

Yes, Newton's Force Problem can be applied to many real-world situations, such as calculating the acceleration of a car or determining the force needed to launch a rocket into space. It is a fundamental concept in physics and is used extensively in engineering and other scientific fields.

5. Are there any limitations to Newton's Force Problem?

While Newton's Force Problem is a useful tool for solving many physics problems, it has some limitations. For example, it assumes that the object is moving in a straight line and that the forces acting on it are constant. In reality, these conditions may not always be true, leading to some inaccuracies in the calculations.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
466
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
707
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
13
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
780
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
557
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
499
Replies
1
Views
299
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
19
Views
611
Back
Top