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How does this hologram work?

  1. Dec 7, 2015 #1
    Recently i stumbled upon this video and got me confused. Any one seen this before? Better yet.. can someone explain how can this hologram work?



    Also on this site i`ve found this: "
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 7, 2015 #2
    They would have to be able to stop light partials in mid-air and keep the partials vibrating at the right frequency while using sensors to calculate the doctors movement and a program to understand the movements to make the image move in correspondence with the doctors movements, all at the same time, I honestly don't think we have the technology for that yet....
     
  4. Dec 8, 2015 #3
    well I don't know if this is legitimate or not. There is a way of making light appear like that perhaps without stopping the light particles. What you do is use a series of lasers that output light at a certain phase and are barely visible or invisible to the naked eye (because the light's amplitude is to low) , then you have them intersect at certain points in free space causing constructive interference increasing the light's amplitude to the point that its visible, then you would need do this many times to make an image and then you need inferred scanners or something to track the doctor's touching it then you need to code for that. I agree with AKatherine I doubt the technology really is capable of suiting those demands but i could be wrong. Also mind you I would really like to see holograms soon that would be awesome. (here's a graph showing the constructive and destructive interference caused by light "waves" colliding with an identical phase relationship)
    http://www.micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/interference/waveinteractions/wavesjavafigure1.jpg [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  5. Dec 8, 2015 #4

    DrClaude

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    The company gives some explanations of their system here: http://www.realviewimaging.com/?page_id=158 [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  6. Dec 8, 2015 #5

    sophiecentaur

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    I think there are two parts to this. I can't think how there can be any 'interference effect', occurring out in the free space / air, as the film implies. There must be a basically 'conventional' hologram, created somewhere at the back of the display and then a clever bit of optics, producing a real image in the position shown in the demo. Very clever, of course, and an excellent tool but it doesn't have to be what is sort of being implied. I suspect that the viewing angle would be fairly narrow, in the same way that the cheap 'floating pig' toy works. I guess there must be a large concave mirror in there. The advertising movie makes it look very Star Wars - as you'd expect. They used the word "digital" a lot - as if there would be any other way of doing it!
    The clever bit has to be creating the hologram in the first place. Could be using ultrasound to create a surface wave pattern on a crystalline surface?
     
  7. Dec 8, 2015 #6

    DrClaude

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  8. Dec 8, 2015 #7

    Andy Resnick

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    Clever- it seems to be a hologram combined with concave mirrors, so that a virtual image is created. Optically, it's the same as the 'floating coin illusion'.
     
  9. Dec 8, 2015 #8

    Andy Resnick

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    It's probably simpler than that- a spatial light modulator, most likely. It's a nice bit of optical design, to be sure.
     
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