How far from the table does the block hit the floor?

In summary, we have a collision between a 0.015-kg bullet and a 4.1-kg block of wood, with the bullet lodging into the wood. Given the initial velocity of the bullet and the height of the table, we can determine how far the block will hit the floor. In the second problem, we have two equal mass hockey pucks colliding, with one being deflected at a specific angle and speed. Using the formulas for velocity components and conservation of momentum, we can solve for the velocity and direction of the second puck after the collision.
  • #1
rugbygirl
5
0
A 0.015-kg bullet traveling horizontally at 399.9 m/s strikes a 4.1-kg block of wood sitting at the edge of a table. The bullet is lodged into the wood. If the table height is 1.2 m, how far from the table does the block hit the floor?

________________________m
 
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  • #2
Momentum/Impulse/Collision

A hockey puck moving along the +x axis at 0.5 m/s collides into another puck that is at rest. The pucks have equal mass. The first puck is deflected 37degrees below the +x axis and moves off at 0.36 m/s. Find the speed and direction of the second puck after the collision.

_______________speed: m/s


direction [please use positive for counterclockwise (above the +x axis) and negative for clockwise (below the +x axis)]:
 
  • #3
Hey rugbygirl. Welcome to PF!

We want to try to help you understand your homework, not just do it for you. Please show any relevant formulas to your problem and the work you have done on it.
 
  • #4
Vx = (first bold) - (second bold)*(cos(angle))
Vy = 0 - (second bold)*(sin(angle))
Vx^2 + Vy^2 = Vf^2
Take sq rt of Vx^2 + Vy^2... I keep getting .255

Part b
tan(angle) = Vy/Vx
do inverse tan in calculator... this gives u the angle... and it will be pos.
 

1. What factors affect the distance a block falls from a table?

The distance a block falls from a table is primarily affected by the height of the table and the acceleration due to gravity. Other factors such as air resistance and the mass and shape of the block can also play a role.

2. How can I calculate the distance a block will fall from a given height?

To calculate the distance a block will fall from a given height, you can use the equation d = ½ * g * t^2, where d is the distance, g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2), and t is the time the block takes to fall. This equation assumes no air resistance and a constant acceleration due to gravity.

3. Does the surface the block lands on affect the distance it falls from the table?

Yes, the surface the block lands on can affect the distance it falls from the table. A softer surface, such as a carpet, can absorb some of the impact and result in a shorter distance fallen compared to a harder surface, such as concrete. Additionally, the coefficient of friction between the block and the surface can also play a role.

4. Can I use the same equation to calculate the distance a block falls from any height?

Yes, the equation d = ½ * g * t^2 can be used to calculate the distance a block falls from any height. However, it is important to note that this equation assumes no air resistance and a constant acceleration due to gravity. In real-world scenarios, other factors may need to be taken into account.

5. Is there a maximum or minimum distance a block can fall from a table?

In theory, there is no maximum or minimum distance a block can fall from a table. However, in practical situations, there may be a maximum height at which a block can be dropped without breaking or a minimum height at which the block may not have enough time to accelerate and reach the ground. Additionally, other factors such as air resistance and the surface the block lands on may also play a role in determining the maximum or minimum distance the block falls from the table.

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