How is it that black holes are black?

In summary, it is believed that light cannot escape a "black" hole due to the immense gravitational pull of the singularity. This is because gravity is considered to be the warping of space, and space is a part of the larger concept of space-time. It is possible that the reason light cannot escape is because the space-time around the singularity is stretched to the point where there is no time for light to escape. This could also mean that, in the future, light may eventually leak out of older black holes or manifest as a different form of energy/matter. This is similar to the concept of slow glass. Overall, the idea is that the escape velocity of a black hole is greater than the speed of light, making them
  • #1
batman226
1
0
It is generally accepted that light cannot escape a "black" hole because the singularity's gravitational pull is too strong for photons (or waves, or wavicles, or whatever) to achieve movement away from the singularity.

Isn't gravity a warping of space? And isn't space a facet of a single phenomenon called space-time?

Could it be that: Since light propagates at a finite velocity -- which means distance per unit time -- there is a certain volume around the singularity where space-time is stretched to the point where there is no time, or insufficient time, for light to escape -- or to escape as electromagnetic energy?

Maybe time in the region is of a nature that the light has not had time, or time yet, to escape. Maybe 2.7 billion years from now, light will finally begin to leak from some older "black holes." Perhaps it will emerge not as light, but as some other energy/matter. Think of a vast slow glass.
 
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  • #2
It's generally said that the escape velocity of the black hole is greater than c, meaning not even light can escape, that's why they're black and we don't see them...
 
  • #3
Here is a best picture I've seen.
It explains everything.
 

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1. What is a black hole?

A black hole is a region in space where the gravitational pull is so strong that it prevents anything, including light, from escaping. It is formed when a massive star dies and collapses in on itself.

2. How is it that black holes are black?

Black holes are black because their gravitational pull is so strong that it does not allow any light to escape. This means that no light can be reflected off of them, making them appear black.

3. How do we know black holes exist?

Scientists have observed the effects of black holes on their surroundings, such as the way they bend light and the way they interact with other objects in space. Additionally, we have been able to detect gravitational waves, which are ripples in space-time caused by the movement of massive objects, including black holes.

4. Can anything escape a black hole?

No, nothing can escape a black hole once it passes the event horizon, which is the point of no return. This includes light, matter, and even information. However, some theories suggest that black holes may emit radiation, known as Hawking radiation, due to quantum effects near the event horizon.

5. Are there different types of black holes?

Yes, there are three types of black holes: stellar, intermediate, and supermassive. Stellar black holes are formed from the collapse of a single massive star, while intermediate black holes are formed from the merger of smaller black holes. Supermassive black holes are found at the center of galaxies and are thought to have formed from the merging of multiple intermediate black holes.

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