How many years would it take before the ice melted?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the amount of heat required to melt a large iceberg and the time it would take for the United States' annual energy consumption to melt it. The given dimensions of the iceberg are 149 km x 27.7 km x 152 m, with a density of 917 kg/m3. The heat required would be calculated using the mass of ice and the heat of fusion for ice, while the mass of water would be found using the density and volume of ice. The answer for part (a) is a large number and part (b) involves comparing this number to the annual energy consumption of the United States in 1994.
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physics1007
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Homework Statement


Occasionally, huge icebergs are found floating on the ocean's currents. Suppose one such iceberg is 149 km long, 27.7 km wide, and 152 m thick. (a) How much heat in joules would be required to melt this iceberg (assumed to be at 0 °C) into liquid water at 0 °C? The density of ice is 917 kg/m3. (b) The annual energy consumption by the United States in 1994 was 9.3 x 1019 J. If this energy were delivered to the iceberg every year, how many years would it take before the ice melted?


Homework Equations


heat required = mass of ice x heat of fusion for ice
mass of water is found from density and volume of ice
density of ice=mass of ice/volume of ice


The Attempt at a Solution



a very large number not worth mentioning b/c its not right!
 
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  • #2
We have no idea why your number is wrong if you do not show us how you calculated it.
 
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I would like to point out that the question of "how many years would it take before the ice melted?" cannot be answered accurately without knowing the initial temperature of the iceberg and the surrounding environment. The rate of melting is affected by factors such as temperature, salinity, and ocean currents. Additionally, the density of the iceberg may change as it melts, making it difficult to determine the exact amount of energy required to melt it.

To answer part (a) of the question, we can use the equation Q = m x L, where Q is the heat required, m is the mass of the ice, and L is the heat of fusion for ice (334 kJ/kg). The mass of the ice can be calculated by multiplying its density (917 kg/m3) by its volume (149 km x 27.7 km x 152 m). This gives us a heat required of approximately 6.1 x 1014 Joules.

For part (b), we need to consider the energy consumption of the United States (9.3 x 1019 J) and the heat required to melt the iceberg (6.1 x 1014 J). Dividing the energy consumption by the heat required gives us approximately 1.5 x 105 years. However, as mentioned earlier, this calculation is not accurate as it does not take into account the changing density of the iceberg and other environmental factors.

In conclusion, the question of how many years it would take for the iceberg to melt cannot be accurately answered without knowing more specific details about the conditions surrounding the iceberg.
 

1. How is the melting of ice affected by climate change?

The melting of ice is primarily caused by rising global temperatures, which are a result of human activities such as burning fossil fuels and deforestation. As the Earth's temperature increases, glaciers and ice sheets melt at a faster rate, leading to rising sea levels and other environmental impacts.

2. How long will it take for all the ice on Earth to melt?

It is difficult to predict an exact timeline for the complete melting of all ice on Earth. However, according to current scientific projections, it is estimated that it could take anywhere from several hundred years to several thousand years for all the ice to melt, depending on the rate of climate change and other factors.

3. How much ice has melted in recent years?

The amount of ice that has melted in recent years varies depending on the region and type of ice. For example, Arctic sea ice has been declining at a rate of 13.2% per decade since 1980, while Antarctic sea ice has been increasing slightly. In terms of land ice, glaciers and ice sheets have also been melting at an accelerated rate in recent years, contributing to sea level rise.

4. What are the consequences of melting ice?

The consequences of melting ice are numerous and far-reaching. Some of the most significant impacts include rising sea levels, which can lead to flooding and displacement of coastal communities, loss of habitat for polar animals, changes in ocean currents and weather patterns, and an increase in global temperatures due to the loss of reflective surfaces on Earth's surface.

5. Can we slow down or reverse the melting of ice?

While the melting of ice is a complex issue with no single solution, there are steps that can be taken to slow down or potentially reverse the process. These include reducing greenhouse gas emissions, transitioning to renewable energy sources, implementing sustainable land use practices, and investing in technologies that can capture and store carbon from the atmosphere.

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