How much weight can vertical aluminum angle support?

In summary, the conversation discusses the need to build a new stand for a concrete laundry tub due to corrosion. The proposed design is to use aluminum angle bars for the legs and horizontal supports, with diagonal bracing and securing it to the wall. The weight of the tub and potential lateral loading from objects in the room are also considered in the design. The conversation also touches on potential issues with the flooring and the choice of materials to reduce corrosion. The individual seeks further advice and suggestions for the design.
  • #1

member 534986

I have to build a new stand for our single compartment concrete laundry tub since two legs of original steel stand are corroded. I want to make the new stand out of angle aluminum to avoid corrosion and also because it's easier to cut and drill.

The laundry tub weighs about 135 lbs. I calculated the volume of the water in the tub when full to be 307 lbs. So the total weight will be about 442 lbs.

For reference, the legs of the original factory made stand are composed of steel angle bars that are 3/4" wide x 3/32" thick.

I want to use 1" wide x 1/8" think aluminum angle bars for the 4 legs and the horizontals on top of the legs to hold up the laundry tub. There will of course be diagonal supports on the stand to keep it from swaying and falling down. Plus the stand will be secured to the back wall and right side built-in cabinet to keep it from swaying.

So the challenge is to know whether four aluminum 1" wide x 1/8" thick x 17" high legs can support 442 lbs. To clarify, angle bars are "L" shaped in cross section, each side being 1" wide.

Thanks for any help,
HRG
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
You have a X-sectional area of 1 sq. in. of Al; strength of Al is around 20,000 lb./sq. in. --- yeah, it oughta hold it.
 
  • #3
Thread closed temporarily for Moderation...

EDIT -- Thread re-opened.
 
Last edited:
  • #4
Bystander said:
You have a X-sectional area of 1 sq. in. of Al; strength of Al is around 20,000 lb./sq. in. --- yeah, it oughta hold it.
Aside from the compressive strength of aluminum, was wondering about the buckling strength of 1" x 1/8" x 17" long aluminum angle. Anyone with data on that? I have not been able to find data on that by Googling.

Thanks,
HRG
 
  • #5
Plus diagonal bracing, good. How exposed are the front legs to lateral loading from mop buckets, lawn mowers, wheel barrows, auto bumpers, sacks of cement being dropped?
 
  • #6
Bystander said:
Plus diagonal bracing, good. How exposed are the front legs to lateral loading from mop buckets, lawn mowers, wheel barrows, auto bumpers, sacks of cement being dropped?
Very minimal exposure to lateral loading accidents. The laundry tub is in a small long room with a long shoe rack on the opposite wall. One wall has the dryer, washing machine, laundry tub and a small built-in cabinet. The opposite wall has space for an opened door and and a long built-in shoe rack. (yes, my wife has a lot of shoes and slippers!) There is 3 feet of space between the the laundry tub and the shoe rack.

A diagonal brace will run from the top horizontal angle bar to the center of each leg. There will be a total of 8 diagonal braces, 2 for each leg.

Thanks,
HRG
 
  • #7
HRG said:
center of each leg

HRG said:
total of 8
Gets you out of the "buckling of unsupported slender columns" length to least dimension ratio trouble zone. And, you're setting it on 2x4s to avoid perforating the linoleum or fracturing the tile?
 
  • #8
Bystander said:
Gets you out of the "buckling of unsupported slender columns" length to least dimension ratio trouble zone. And, you're setting it on 2x4s to avoid perforating the linoleum or fracturing the tile?
The floor is new self stick vinyl tile that I'm installing since the laundry tub is currently moved. Been wanting to replace the beat up laundry room floor tile for a long while now.

Thanks for your insight. I'll set the legs on small pieces of 3/32" thick scrap aluminum that I have available. Each piece will be about 1-1/2" square with rounded corners. Everything being aluminum should reduce any corrosion or different metal problems. The bolts and nuts will be stainless steel.

Any other design ideas are welcome. Thanks,
HRG
 

1. How much weight can a vertical aluminum angle support?

The amount of weight a vertical aluminum angle can support depends on several factors, including the grade of the aluminum, the thickness of the angle, and the length of the angle. Generally, a 1-inch thick aluminum angle can support up to 6061 pounds per foot.

2. Is there a weight limit for vertical aluminum angle supports?

Yes, there is a weight limit for vertical aluminum angle supports. The maximum weight that can be supported depends on the factors mentioned above, as well as the method of installation and the condition of the angle. It is important to consult a structural engineer for specific weight limit calculations.

3. How do I determine the weight capacity of a vertical aluminum angle?

The weight capacity of a vertical aluminum angle can be determined by calculating the moment of inertia and section modulus of the angle, which are based on the dimensions and material properties of the angle. This information can then be used to calculate the maximum load that the angle can support.

4. Can a vertical aluminum angle support more weight if it is longer?

In general, a longer vertical aluminum angle will have a higher weight capacity than a shorter one. This is because longer angles have a higher moment of inertia and section modulus, which allow them to support more weight. However, there may be other factors that can affect the weight capacity, so it is important to consult a structural engineer for accurate calculations.

5. What is the maximum length of a vertical aluminum angle to maintain its weight capacity?

The maximum length of a vertical aluminum angle to maintain its weight capacity depends on the grade and thickness of the angle. Thicker and higher-grade angles can support longer lengths without compromising their weight capacity. It is important to consult a structural engineer to determine the appropriate length for your specific application.

Suggested for: How much weight can vertical aluminum angle support?

Back
Top