How should i correct speed to keep induction constant for different viscosities

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of a weaker magnet or adding resistance to a coil in order to get a magnet to fall through a coil at the same rate in both submerged and non-submerged conditions. The speaker also mentions having ideas on how to balance the viscosity of different liquids but is unsure of how to calculate the necessary adjustments. They question if their original post has been overlooked or if there is something wrong with their question.
  • #1
K_F_Gauss
5
0
So i am going to be dropping a magnet through a coil that is a submerged in a liquid. Say that this liquid is 100% lemon juice, how would i get the magnet to approximately fall through the coil at the same rate for the submerged coil and a coil that is not submerged?
 
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  • #2
Does my question not make sense or is something wrong with it?
 
  • #3
I don't know, it may have been overlooked... but there doesn't seem to be much to it. You'd just use a weaker magnet, or add resistance to the coil, when it's falling through the liquid.
 
  • #4
diazona said:
I don't know, it may have been overlooked... but there doesn't seem to be much to it. You'd just use a weaker magnet, or add resistance to the coil, when it's falling through the liquid.

I have lots of ideas on how to do it but I do not know by what factor, or how to get viscosity into the equation.
 
  • #5
Its been a week since my original post, is this in the wrong section?
 
  • #6
K_F_Gauss said:
Does my question not make sense or is something wrong with it?
I accept with information: it may have been overlooked but there doesn't seem to be much to it. You'd just use a weaker magnet, or add resistance to the coil.
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  • #7
hobirbri said:
I accept with information: it may have been overlooked but there doesn't seem to be much to it. You'd just use a weaker magnet, or add resistance to the coil.
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Again, I already have different ideas about how I should adjust the setup to balance the viscosity, but I do not know by how much I should adjust it. Say I have liquid with a viscosity of 1.0 pascal seconds and another with 0.50 pascal seconds, I am using a hypothetical coil with zero resistance, by how much should the resistance be increased for the substance with viscosity of 1? Is there no equation for this?
 

Related to How should i correct speed to keep induction constant for different viscosities

1. How does viscosity affect induction?

Viscosity is a measure of a fluid's resistance to flow. As viscosity increases, the fluid becomes thicker and more difficult to move. This can impact the rate of induction, as a higher viscosity requires more energy to maintain the same level of induction.

2. Why is it important to keep induction constant for different viscosities?

Maintaining a constant induction is important for accurate and consistent results in scientific experiments. Varying the induction for different viscosities can lead to inconsistent data and make it difficult to draw meaningful conclusions.

3. What factors can affect induction and viscosity?

There are several factors that can impact both induction and viscosity, such as temperature, pressure, and the type of fluid being used. It is important to control and monitor these factors in order to maintain a constant induction for different viscosities.

4. How can I correct speed to keep induction constant for different viscosities?

The specific method for correcting speed will vary depending on the experimental setup and the type of fluid being used. In general, it may involve adjusting the speed of the motor or pump, changing the size or shape of the mixing vessel, or adding additional mixing elements.

5. Are there any tools or techniques that can help with maintaining constant induction for different viscosities?

Yes, there are various tools and techniques that can aid in maintaining a constant induction for different viscosities. Some examples include using a viscometer to measure the viscosity of the fluid, using a rheometer to monitor changes in viscosity during the experiment, and implementing automated control systems to adjust speed and other variables as needed.

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