How to approach learning Physics and the relevant Maths

In summary, Jason is an individual who has an interest in pursuing higher-level education in physics. He has started studying online for tutoring in trigonometry and physics, and is also purchasing some textbooks to help him get a better understanding of the subject. He notes that he is not completely sure what he wants to do with his education, but he wants to pursue Astrophysics. Jason does not have any formal education in physics, but he is planning to finish his current course and then pursue higher education in the field.
  • #1
jasonrl
4
0
Hey,
My name is Jason,
I am currently allmost through Electro technology course, and have studied DC, Magnetism and currently studying Alternating Current Circuits
The maths i have been learning while studying this course would be some Algebra, Trigonometry, Pythagoras Theorem, vectors etc.
I have never studied Calculus so i would need to learn this from scratch
I am interested in learning Physics and have been studying it on the side of my current course
I was wondering if anyone can point me in the right direction with the best way for me to get the foundations of Physics and any additional Mathematics i need to focus on?
I have started online tutoring in Trigonometry and Physics also this week to start to grasp principles
I have also purchased some textbooks from various university students
Introductory Physics Chris Turville and Bobby Vaille
Conceptual Physics Paul G Hewill
Calculus 4th Edition
Geometry and Trigonometry A.J Sadler
My big interest in Physics is Astrophysics, and i am going to work towards this in my studies but i need to have all the foundations first, and the mathematics level achieved
Cheers Jason
 
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  • #2
Welcome to the forum.

The single biggest thing you will want is calculus. Lots and lots of calculus. Then, depending on exactly where you go and what you do there are lots of other aspects to math that will be useful in physics.

Just to toss out a few in no particular order: differential equations, differential geometry, matrix math, tensors, group theory. You could spend many years learning this stuff.

The thing to do is to figure out where you want to go. You mention astrophysics. If you are interested in, for example, nuclear reactions in stars, that is one kind of math. If you are interested in gravity theory that is another kind of math. If you are interested in the theory that goes with understanding observations, building telescopes or radio telescopes, and related stuff, it's another kind of math. There are other specialties.

Most people study this stuff in a university setting. A few brave souls do it on their own. If you are going to study at a school then check what that school wants for admission. That will be a good guide to what to study on your own before starting classes.
 
  • #3
Hello DEvans,
Thankyou for your response I really appreciate you taking the time to help !
You have definitely made me aware that there are many branches in the astrophysics.
I am interested in the Planets, solar System formation, stars and galaxies
I am not sure where it will all take me but it has Allways been a big interest to me
I am going to work on my Maths skills for a while and then I will look into university and what the requirements are definitely
Thanks again for your thoughts :)
Kind Regards Jason
 
  • #4
jasonrl said:
Hey,
My name is Jason,
I am currently allmost through Electro technology course, and have studied DC, Magnetism and currently studying Alternating Current Circuits
The maths i have been learning while studying this course would be some Algebra, Trigonometry, Pythagoras Theorem, vectors etc.
I have never studied Calculus so i would need to learn this from scratch
I am interested in learning Physics and have been studying it on the side of my current course
I was wondering if anyone can point me in the right direction with the best way for me to get the foundations of Physics and any additional Mathematics i need to focus on?
I have started online tutoring in Trigonometry and Physics also this week to start to grasp principles
I have also purchased some textbooks from various university students
Introductory Physics Chris Turville and Bobby Vaille
Conceptual Physics Paul G Hewill
Calculus 4th Edition
Geometry and Trigonometry A.J Sadler
My big interest in Physics is Astrophysics, and i am going to work towards this in my studies but i need to have all the foundations first, and the mathematics level achieved
Cheers Jason

There is a bunch of things that I am simply not understanding here, and I don't know if anyone can answer this without learning more about what's going on.

1. What exactly is this "Electro technology course"? Is this an undergraduate degree program, or a vocational training? Why is there no calculus requirement here, or that you haven't had to need calculus for this course?

2. Are you planning on finishing this, and THEN change direction and restart your undergraduate education in physics? Or do you intend to use your knowledge/degree/etc. from this Electro technology course to pursue higher-level education (i.e. beyond undergraduate level) in physics?

3. Where in the world are you? Where in the world do you intend to go to school?

4. What is your existing OFFICIAL level of education? You can study "on the side" as much as you want, but without proper credentials to certify that you have the knowledge, you can't go far. Without documentation, it doesn't exist.

Zz.
 
  • #5
Hello ZapperZ

Thank you for your response

In regards to Electrotechnology, this is a Certificate 3 Electricians course and once completed i will be a licensed electrician.
I am planning on finishing this certificate by the end of this year as i am almost through.
I intend to use my existing knowledge and skills from the Electrotechnology studies to pursue higher level education beyond undergraduate level in physics
My OFFICIAL level of education is undergraduate , and from there i have been studying and working in the Electrical Power Generation industry for over 10 years
I work full time long hours and i am always learning new levels of subjects in my current field, I put extensive hours into studying in my spare time and i also have weekly tutoring in Mathematics/Physics, i also have a good understanding of Magnetism from my current studies so i intend to build on my Mathematics skills first in order to pursue further Physics studies.
Kind Regards,
Jason
 
  • #6
jasonrl said:
I intend to use my existing knowledge and skills from the Electrotechnology studies to pursue higher level education beyond undergraduate level in physics

And how exactly are you going to do this? Since your electrotechnology course does not require calculus, it will be quite useless for a graduate degree in physics (especially for such a thing as astrophysics). Sure, you will have a nice knowledge of electricity and magnetism. But if there are no official credentials that show that you can handle physics such as QM, stat mech, classical mechanics, then you will not get into a grad school. Self-studying is useful, but it will not suffice to get you into grad school since you won't have an official transcript that says that you passed the courses.
 
  • #7
Hello Micromass,
I think you have misunderstood let me explain further.
I am only not only doing my studies at home, I did mention that I will be working on my Mathematics first and using some of my knowledge as a stepping stone into further studies.
I will be attending Calculus classes and algebra and all Maths that is required this year until my Maths is at the level needed.
Then I will be completing 2 units with OUA open university before the end of the year, this is the entry level required as I have spoken to Murdoch university and they have advised this.
I am currently enrolled as undergraduate in Open University for classical Physics principles of Physics which has topics such as
Classical Physics, engineering, metallurgy, physical, biological and health sciences, some of the content will include
Vectors,linear and circular motion, dynamics of mass and weight motion,energy, plus many more which are found in the unit description online
This gives me a good understanding of Classical Physics
Then I will also enrol for the prerequisite mathematics unit
Once a pass is achieved in these 2 units I can then apply for the Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics in 2016
It will be a exciting road and I have all the drive to succeed
Thank you for your input and I hope this has cleared things up for you
Kind regards
Jason
 

Related to How to approach learning Physics and the relevant Maths

1. What is the best way to approach learning Physics and Maths?

The best approach to learning Physics and Maths is to start by building a strong foundation of the fundamental concepts. This includes understanding the basic laws and principles, as well as developing problem-solving skills. It is also important to regularly practice and review the material to reinforce your understanding.

2. How important is it to have a strong understanding of Maths when studying Physics?

Maths is an essential component of studying Physics as it provides the language and tools necessary to understand and solve problems in the subject. It is crucial to have a strong foundation in Maths, particularly in algebra, calculus, and trigonometry, to effectively comprehend and apply the concepts in Physics.

3. What are some effective study strategies for learning Physics and Maths?

Some effective study strategies for learning Physics and Maths include practicing regularly, breaking down complex problems into smaller steps, using visual aids like diagrams and graphs, and seeking help from teachers or tutors when needed. It is also helpful to connect the concepts to real-world applications to better understand their relevance.

4. How can I improve my problem-solving skills in Physics and Maths?

To improve your problem-solving skills in Physics and Maths, it is important to practice regularly and approach problems systematically. Start by identifying what is given and what is being asked, then break down the problem into smaller steps and use relevant equations and concepts to solve it. It is also helpful to review and analyze your mistakes to learn from them.

5. Is it necessary to have strong mathematical abilities to excel in Physics?

While having a strong foundation in Maths is important for studying Physics, it is not the only factor that determines success in the subject. Other important skills such as critical thinking, creativity, and perseverance also play a significant role. With practice and dedication, anyone can excel in Physics, regardless of their initial mathematical abilities.

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