How to build something to vacuum and convey concrete powder

In summary, A cyclonic separator prevents dust passing through the centrifugal vacuum pump. Vacuum conveyors are used quite extensively in industr for transport of bulk materials. A shop vac may work with longer hoses, but an industrial strength version would be needed for 50 tons. Just shovel the cement into the bag and your done in a day, or two.
  • #1
Need to move some concrete powder, would like to use compressed air or a blower. I will need it to vacuum and convey the product, the storage vessel is broken and there is no way to gravity or manually feed it. The vertical distance is 8-10' and no more then 20' horizontal. I have played around on a small scale with a 2" pvc compression fitting drilled and fitted with my air inlet and a smaller pipe on the inside drilled with angle holes in it and it seems to move oil dry pretty good as long as I keep the suction side short.I have had no luck with anything bigger. I would like to use 3" or 4". Can anyone help with ideas on what would work and what size blower or compressor would be needed to accomplish this. Have access to a pretty good size blower or will rent a big compressor. About 50 tons of material to move. Thanks in advance for any help that may be offered.
 
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  • #2
latemodel18 said:
Need to move some concrete powder, would like to use compressed air or a blower. I will need it to vacuum and convey the product, the storage vessel is broken and there is no way to gravity or manually feed it. The vertical distance is 8-10' and no more then 20' horizontal. I have played around on a small scale with a 2" pvc compression fitting drilled and fitted with my air inlet and a smaller pipe on the inside drilled with angle holes in it and it seems to move oil dry pretty good as long as I keep the suction side short.I have had no luck with anything bigger. I would like to use 3" or 4". Can anyone help with ideas on what would work and what size blower or compressor would be needed to accomplish this. Have access to a pretty good size blower or will rent a big compressor. About 50 tons of material to move. Thanks in advance for any help that may be offered.

What about a Shop Vac? Would that work with longer hoses? You could use an industrial strength version if needed...
 
  • #3
From what I am told, the motors do not last long with the concrete dust and it might take awhile for 50 tons. I am sure they sell purpose built equipment for this, just trying to build something since the customer already owns a 50hp blower. Thanks for the reply
 
  • #5
Vacuum conveyors are used quite extensively in industr for transport of bulk materials.
Trying to hand make a working model isn't just an overnight task.

Your system would eventually be similar to this, perhaps not on that scale depending on vacuum pipe size.
http://christianson.com/brands/augervac/
The pipe coming out the right hand side is the vacuum hose.

I am not sure a centrifugal blower has the oomph to develop the pressures andair flow needed for you task.
http://www.polimak.com/Roots_Blower_Pneumatic.htm
shows a positive displacement blower/compressor.

If instead , you bag the material , 50 tons is about 1000 bags at 100pds bag.
There are industrial bags that hold a ton, give or take, that you move can move around by the attached straps. Hooking and lifting with a front end loader or forklift would work.
Just shovel the cement into the bag and your done in a day, or two.
 
  • #6
Separate the air pump from the transport system with an eductor or eductors.

I enjoy the daydream of designing an air powered household vacuum using eductors and jets in place of the brush roll.
 
  • #7
you'd need about 2000 bags at 50lbs a bag handling 100lb bags in a confined uneven space would be problematic. the idea of using the garden bags like the ones for masons sand sounds much better get two guys with shovels filling those and use a crane to haul it out probably take two days to do and costs about $1800 Can/US to do depending on labor cost of the guys shoveling and the crane length.
 

1. How does a vacuum system work to convey concrete powder?

A vacuum system uses suction to pull concrete powder through a series of pipes and into a collection tank. The suction is created by a vacuum pump, which creates a pressure differential in the pipes and allows the powder to be pulled through.

2. What materials are needed to build a vacuum system for concrete powder?

You will need pipes, a vacuum pump, a collection tank, and various fittings and valves to connect everything together. It is important to use materials that are durable and resistant to the abrasiveness of concrete powder.

3. How is the vacuum system powered?

The vacuum pump can be powered by electricity or by a gasoline or diesel engine. It is important to choose a power source that is reliable and appropriate for the size and capacity of the vacuum system.

4. How can I ensure the vacuum system is safe to use with concrete powder?

It is important to properly maintain and regularly inspect the vacuum system to ensure it is in good working condition. The pipes should be free of any cracks or damage, and the vacuum pump should be regularly serviced. It is also important to wear proper protective gear when using the system, such as goggles and a face mask.

5. How much does it cost to build a vacuum system for concrete powder?

The cost of building a vacuum system for concrete powder will vary depending on the size and capacity of the system, as well as the specific materials and components used. It is important to research and compare prices for different parts and suppliers to find the most cost-effective option for your needs.

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