How to Thin Si02 for Automotive Repair

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In summary: Jim, I thought it may have been some kind of solvent as its supposed to evaporate quite quickly after application n please don't think I'm disputing you at all. I'm extremely grateful for your help.
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Hi folks is there anyone who could help me with si02 please
 
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Gaz1974 said:
Hi folks is there anyone who could help me with si02 please
You want to deposit it as part of making your own integrated circuits? :smile:
 
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Gaz1974 said:
Hi folks is there anyone who could help me with si02 please
You need to be more specific. What help are you looking for?
 
  • #4
Ok I'm looking at making my own and for my own use ceramic coating for my car motorcycle and mtb...so I have a large jar of silica dioxide and so far I have found out how to hopefully liquefy it to a thick liquid, now I am stumped on what to thin it down.. some kind of carrier solvent.
Thanks
 
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Silicon dioxide is quartz - a hard mineral with a melting point of ~1700 C. You will not liquefy it easily. I suspect what you have is sodium silicate or sodium metasilicate, also referred to as "water glass". I think you can thin it with water. You should be careful with it. The dried residue can be very dangerous to inhale.
 
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You thin it with water - assuming water glass. Consider reading this - especially the uses section - before you waste materials.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_silicate

The covering you create is brittle. (automotive repair section) What you are really doing is making a finish out of thin windows glass.
 
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phyzguy said:
Silicon dioxide is quartz - a hard mineral with a melting point of ~1700 C. You will not liquefy it easily. I suspect what you have is sodium silicate or sodium metasilicate, also referred to as "water glass". I think you can thin it with water. You should be careful with it. The dried residue can be very dangerous to inhale.
Thank you phyzguy that is really helpful. I am definitely no chemist but do take health and safety serious, gloves, glasses, quality dust mask and tend to do a bit of research before trying things...quite boring really lol
 
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jim mcnamara said:
You thin it with water - assuming water glass. Consider reading this - especially the uses section - before you waste materials.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_silicate

The covering you create is brittle. (automotive repair section) What you are really doing is making a finish out of thin windows glass.
Thanks Jim, I thought it may have been some kind of solvent as its supposed to evaporate quite quickly after application n please don't think I'm disputing you at all. I'm extremely grateful for your help.
Thanks
 
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1. What is SiO2 or silicon dioxide?

SiO2, or silicon dioxide, is a chemical compound made up of one silicon atom and two oxygen atoms. It is found in many forms in nature, including quartz, sand, and glass.

2. What are the properties of SiO2?

SiO2 has a high melting point, is insoluble in water, and is a poor conductor of electricity. It is also very hard and resistant to chemical reactions, making it useful in many industrial and technological applications.

3. How is SiO2 used in everyday life?

SiO2 is used in the production of glass, ceramics, and concrete. It is also used in the semiconductor industry to make computer chips, and in the production of solar panels, as well as in many other applications.

4. Is SiO2 harmful to humans?

Pure SiO2, or silicon dioxide, is not harmful to humans. However, prolonged exposure to fine particles of SiO2, such as in the form of dust, can cause respiratory problems. In its crystalline form, SiO2 can also cause lung disease if inhaled in large quantities.

5. How is SiO2 extracted and processed?

SiO2 is usually extracted from sand or quartz using high heat and chemicals. It is then processed into various forms, such as silica gel or fumed silica, depending on its intended use.

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